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This is simply a copy of what you should see on running man mlr at a command prompt, once Miller is installed on your system.

MILLER(1)                                                            MILLER(1)



NAME
       Miller -- like awk, sed, cut, join, and sort for name-indexed data such
       as CSV and tabular JSON.

SYNOPSIS
       Usage: mlr [flags] {verb} [verb-dependent options ...] {zero or more
       file names}

       If zero file names are provided, standard input is read, e.g.
         mlr --csv sort -f shape example.csv

       Output of one verb may be chained as input to another using "then",
       e.g.
         mlr --csv stats1 -a min,mean,max -f quantity then sort -f color
       example.csv

       Please see 'mlr help topics' for more information.  Please also see
       https://miller.readthedocs.io


DESCRIPTION
       Miller operates on key-value-pair data while the familiar Unix tools
       operate on integer-indexed fields: if the natural data structure for
       the latter is the array, then Miller's natural data structure is the
       insertion-ordered hash map.  This encompasses a variety of data
       formats, including but not limited to the familiar CSV, TSV, and JSON.
       (Miller can handle positionally-indexed data as a special case.) This
       manpage documents mlr 6.2.0-dev.

EXAMPLES
       mlr --icsv --opprint cat example.csv
       mlr --icsv --opprint sort -f shape example.csv
       mlr --icsv --opprint sort -f shape -nr index example.csv
       mlr --icsv --opprint cut -f flag,shape example.csv
       mlr --csv filter '$color == "red"' example.csv
       mlr --icsv --ojson put '$ratio = $quantity / $rate' example.csv
       mlr --icsv --opprint --from example.csv sort -nr index then cut -f shape,quantity

FILE FORMATS
       CSV/CSV-lite: comma-separated values with separate header line
       TSV: same but with tabs in places of commas
       +---------------------+
       | apple,bat,cog       |
       | 1,2,3               | Record 1: "apple":"1", "bat":"2", "cog":"3"
       | 4,5,6               | Record 2: "apple":"4", "bat":"5", "cog":"6"
       +---------------------+

       JSON (array of objects):
       +---------------------+
       | [                   |
       | {                   |
       |  "apple": 1,        | Record 1: "apple":"1", "bat":"2", "cog":"3"
       |  "bat": 2,          |
       |  "cog": 3           |
       | },                  |
       | {                   |
       |   "dish": {         | Record 2: "dish.egg":"7",
       |     "egg": 7,       | "dish.flint":"8", "garlic":""
       |     "flint": 8      |
       |   },                |
       |   "garlic": ""      |
       | }                   |
       | ]                   |
       +---------------------+

       JSON Lines (sequence of one-line objects):
       +------------------------------------------------+
       | {"apple": 1, "bat": 2, "cog": 3}               |
       | {"dish": {"egg": 7, "flint": 8}, "garlic": ""} |
       +------------------------------------------------+
         Record 1: "apple":"1", "bat":"2", "cog":"3"
         Record 2: "dish:egg":"7", "dish:flint":"8", "garlic":""

       PPRINT: pretty-printed tabular
       +---------------------+
       | apple bat cog       |
       | 1     2   3         | Record 1: "apple:"1", "bat":"2", "cog":"3"
       | 4     5   6         | Record 2: "apple":"4", "bat":"5", "cog":"6"
       +---------------------+

       Markdown tabular (supported for output only):
       +-----------------------+
       | | apple | bat | cog | |
       | | ---   | --- | --- | |
       | | 1     | 2   | 3   | | Record 1: "apple:"1", "bat":"2", "cog":"3"
       | | 4     | 5   | 6   | | Record 2: "apple":"4", "bat":"5", "cog":"6"
       +-----------------------+

       XTAB: pretty-printed transposed tabular
       +---------------------+
       | apple 1             | Record 1: "apple":"1", "bat":"2", "cog":"3"
       | bat   2             |
       | cog   3             |
       |                     |
       | dish 7              | Record 2: "dish":"7", "egg":"8"
       | egg  8              |
       +---------------------+

       DKVP: delimited key-value pairs (Miller default format)
       +---------------------+
       | apple=1,bat=2,cog=3 | Record 1: "apple":"1", "bat":"2", "cog":"3"
       | dish=7,egg=8,flint  | Record 2: "dish":"7", "egg":"8", "3":"flint"
       +---------------------+

       NIDX: implicitly numerically indexed (Unix-toolkit style)
       +---------------------+
       | the quick brown     | Record 1: "1":"the", "2":"quick", "3":"brown"
       | fox jumped          | Record 2: "1":"fox", "2":"jumped"
       +---------------------+

HELP OPTIONS
       Type 'mlr help {topic}' for any of the following:
       Essentials:
         mlr help topics
         mlr help basic-examples
         mlr help file-formats
       Flags:
         mlr help flags
         mlr help list-separator-aliases
         mlr help list-separator-regex-aliases
         mlr help comments-in-data-flags
         mlr help compressed-data-flags
         mlr help csv/tsv-only-flags
         mlr help file-format-flags
         mlr help flatten-unflatten-flags
         mlr help format-conversion-keystroke-saver-flags
         mlr help legacy-flags
         mlr help miscellaneous-flags
         mlr help output-colorization-flags
         mlr help pprint-only-flags
         mlr help profiling-flags
         mlr help separator-flags
       Verbs:
         mlr help list-verbs
         mlr help usage-verbs
         mlr help verb
       Functions:
         mlr help list-functions
         mlr help list-function-classes
         mlr help list-functions-in-class
         mlr help usage-functions
         mlr help usage-functions-by-class
         mlr help function
       Keywords:
         mlr help list-keywords
         mlr help usage-keywords
         mlr help keyword
       Other:
         mlr help auxents
         mlr help mlrrc
         mlr help output-colorization
         mlr help type-arithmetic-info
       Shorthands:
         mlr -g = mlr help flags
         mlr -l = mlr help list-verbs
         mlr -L = mlr help usage-verbs
         mlr -f = mlr help list-functions
         mlr -F = mlr help usage-functions
         mlr -k = mlr help list-keywords
         mlr -K = mlr help usage-keywords
       Lastly, 'mlr help ...' will search for your exact text '...' using the sources of
       'mlr help flag', 'mlr help verb', 'mlr help function', and 'mlr help keyword'.
       Use 'mlr help find ...' for approximate (substring) matches, e.g. 'mlr help find map'
       for all things with "map" in their names.

VERB LIST
       altkv bar bootstrap cat check clean-whitespace count-distinct count
       count-similar cut decimate fill-down fill-empty filter flatten format-values
       fraction gap grep group-by group-like having-fields head histogram json-parse
       json-stringify join label latin1-to-utf8 utf8-to-latin1 least-frequent
       merge-fields most-frequent nest nothing put regularize remove-empty-columns
       rename reorder repeat reshape sample sec2gmtdate sec2gmt seqgen shuffle
       skip-trivial-records sort sort-within-records split stats1 stats2 step tac
       tail tee template top unflatten uniq unsparsify

FUNCTION LIST
       abs acos acosh any append apply arrayify asin asinh asserting_absent
       asserting_array asserting_bool asserting_boolean asserting_empty
       asserting_empty_map asserting_error asserting_float asserting_int
       asserting_map asserting_nonempty_map asserting_not_array asserting_not_empty
       asserting_not_map asserting_not_null asserting_null asserting_numeric
       asserting_present asserting_string atan atan2 atanh bitcount boolean
       capitalize cbrt ceil clean_whitespace collapse_whitespace concat cos cosh
       depth dhms2fsec dhms2sec erf erfc every exp expm1 flatten float floor fmtifnum
       fmtnum fold format fsec2dhms fsec2hms get_keys get_values gmt2localtime
       gmt2sec gssub gsub haskey hexfmt hms2fsec hms2sec hostname int invqnorm
       is_absent is_array is_bool is_boolean is_empty is_empty_map is_error is_float
       is_int is_map is_nan is_nonempty_map is_not_array is_not_empty is_not_map
       is_not_null is_null is_numeric is_present is_string joink joinkv joinv
       json_parse json_stringify latin1_to_utf8 leafcount length localtime2gmt
       localtime2sec log log10 log1p logifit lstrip madd mapdiff mapexcept mapselect
       mapsum max md5 mexp min mmul msub os pow qnorm reduce regextract
       regextract_or_else round roundm rstrip sec2dhms sec2gmt sec2gmtdate sec2hms
       sec2localdate sec2localtime select sgn sha1 sha256 sha512 sin sinh sort splita
       splitax splitkv splitkvx splitnv splitnvx sqrt ssub strftime strftime_local
       string strip strlen strptime strptime_local sub substr substr0 substr1 system
       systime systimeint tan tanh tolower toupper truncate typeof unflatten unformat
       unformatx uptime urand urand32 urandelement urandint urandrange utf8_to_latin1
       version ! != !=~ % & && * ** + - . .* .+ .- ./ / // < << <= <=> == =~ > >= >>
       >>> ?: ?? ??? ^ ^^ | || ~

COMMENTS-IN-DATA FLAGS
       Miller lets you put comments in your data, such as

           # This is a comment for a CSV file
           a,b,c
           1,2,3
           4,5,6

       Notes:

       * Comments are only honored at the start of a line.
       * In the absence of any of the below four options, comments are data like
         any other text. (The comments-in-data feature is opt-in.)
       * When `--pass-comments` is used, comment lines are written to standard output
         immediately upon being read; they are not part of the record stream.  Results
         may be counterintuitive. A suggestion is to place comments at the start of
         data files.

       --pass-comments          Immediately print commented lines (prefixed by `#`)
                                within the input.
       --pass-comments-with {string}
                                Immediately print commented lines within input, with
                                specified prefix.
       --skip-comments          Ignore commented lines (prefixed by `#`) within the
                                input.
       --skip-comments-with {string}
                                Ignore commented lines within input, with specified
                                prefix.

COMPRESSED-DATA FLAGS
       Miller offers a few different ways to handle reading data files
            which have been compressed.

       * Decompression done within the Miller process itself: `--bz2in` `--gzin` `--zin`
       * Decompression done outside the Miller process: `--prepipe` `--prepipex`

       Using `--prepipe` and `--prepipex` you can specify an action to be
       taken on each input file.  The prepipe command must be able to read from
       standard input; it will be invoked with `{command} < {filename}`.  The
       prepipex command must take a filename as argument; it will be invoked with
       `{command} {filename}`.

       Examples:

           mlr --prepipe gunzip
           mlr --prepipe zcat -cf
           mlr --prepipe xz -cd
           mlr --prepipe cat

       Note that this feature is quite general and is not limited to decompression
       utilities. You can use it to apply per-file filters of your choice.  For output
       compression (or other) utilities, simply pipe the output:
       `mlr ... | {your compression command} > outputfilenamegoeshere`

       Lastly, note that if `--prepipe` or `--prepipex` is specified, it replaces any
       decisions that might have been made based on the file suffix. Likewise,
       `--gzin`/`--bz2in`/`--zin` are ignored if `--prepipe` is also specified.

       --bz2in                  Uncompress bzip2 within the Miller process. Done by
                                default if file ends in `.bz2`.
       --gzin                   Uncompress gzip within the Miller process. Done by
                                default if file ends in `.gz`.
       --prepipe {decompression command}
                                You can, of course, already do without this for
                                single input files, e.g. `gunzip < myfile.csv.gz |
                                mlr ...`. Allowed at the command line, but not in
                                `.mlrrc` to avoid unexpected code execution.
       --prepipe-bz2            Same as `--prepipe bz2`, except this is allowed in
                                `.mlrrc`.
       --prepipe-gunzip         Same as `--prepipe gunzip`, except this is allowed in
                                `.mlrrc`.
       --prepipe-zcat           Same as `--prepipe zcat`, except this is allowed in
                                `.mlrrc`.
       --prepipex {decompression command}
                                Like `--prepipe` with one exception: doesn't insert
                                `<` between command and filename at runtime. Useful
                                for some commands like `unzip -qc` which don't read
                                standard input. Allowed at the command line, but not
                                in `.mlrrc` to avoid unexpected code execution.
       --zin                    Uncompress zlib within the Miller process. Done by
                                default if file ends in `.z`.

CSV/TSV-ONLY FLAGS
       These are flags which are applicable to CSV format.

       --allow-ragged-csv-input or --ragged or --allow-ragged-tsv-input
                                If a data line has fewer fields than the header line,
                                fill remaining keys with empty string. If a data line
                                has more fields than the header line, use integer
                                field labels as in the implicit-header case.
       --headerless-csv-output or --ho or --headerless-tsv-output
                                Print only CSV/TSV data lines; do not print CSV/TSV
                                header lines.
       --implicit-csv-header or --headerless-csv-input or --hi or --implicit-tsv-header
                                Use 1,2,3,... as field labels, rather than from line
                                1 of input files. Tip: combine with `label` to
                                recreate missing headers.
       --lazy-quotes            Accepts quotes appearing in unquoted fields, and
                                non-doubled quotes appearing in quoted fields.
       --no-implicit-csv-header or --no-implicit-tsv-header
                                Opposite of `--implicit-csv-header`. This is the
                                default anyway -- the main use is for the flags to
                                `mlr join` if you have main file(s) which are
                                headerless but you want to join in on a file which
                                does have a CSV/TSV header. Then you could use `mlr
                                --csv --implicit-csv-header join
                                --no-implicit-csv-header -l
                                your-join-in-with-header.csv ...
                                your-headerless.csv`.
       -N                       Keystroke-saver for `--implicit-csv-header
                                --headerless-csv-output`.

FILE-FORMAT FLAGS
       See the File formats doc page, and or `mlr help file-formats`, for more
       about file formats Miller supports.

       Examples: `--csv` for CSV-formatted input and output; `--icsv --opprint` for
       CSV-formatted input and pretty-printed output.

       Please use `--iformat1 --oformat2` rather than `--format1 --oformat2`.
       The latter sets up input and output flags for `format1`, not all of which
       are overridden in all cases by setting output format to `format2`.

       --asv or --asvlite       Use ASV format for input and output data.
       --csv or -c              Use CSV format for input and output data.
       --csvlite                Use CSV-lite format for input and output data.
       --dkvp                   Use DKVP format for input and output data.
       --gen-field-name         Specify field name for --igen. Defaults to "i".
       --gen-start              Specify start value for --igen. Defaults to 1.
       --gen-step               Specify step value for --igen. Defaults to 1.
       --gen-stop               Specify stop value for --igen. Defaults to 100.
       --iasv or --iasvlite     Use ASV format for input data.
       --icsv                   Use CSV format for input data.
       --icsvlite               Use CSV-lite format for input data.
       --idkvp                  Use DKVP format for input data.
       --igen                   Ignore input files and instead generate sequential
                                numeric input using --gen-field-name, --gen-start,
                                --gen-step, and --gen-stop values. See also the
                                seqgen verb, which is more useful/intuitive.
       --ijson                  Use JSON format for input data.
       --ijsonl                 Use JSON Lines format for input data.
       --inidx                  Use NIDX format for input data.
       --io {format name}       Use format name for input and output data. For
                                example: `--io csv` is the same as `--csv`.
       --ipprint                Use PPRINT format for input data.
       --itsv                   Use TSV format for input data.
       --itsvlite               Use TSV-lite format for input data.
       --iusv or --iusvlite     Use USV format for input data.
       --ixtab                  Use XTAB format for input data.
       --json or -j             Use JSON format for input and output data.
       --jsonl                  Use JSON Lines format for input and output data.
       --nidx                   Use NIDX format for input and output data.
       --oasv or --oasvlite     Use ASV format for output data.
       --ocsv                   Use CSV format for output data.
       --ocsvlite               Use CSV-lite format for output data.
       --odkvp                  Use DKVP format for output data.
       --ojson                  Use JSON format for output data.
       --ojsonl                 Use JSON Lines format for output data.
       --omd                    Use markdown-tabular format for output data.
       --onidx                  Use NIDX format for output data.
       --opprint                Use PPRINT format for output data.
       --otsv                   Use TSV format for output data.
       --otsvlite               Use TSV-lite format for output data.
       --ousv or --ousvlite     Use USV format for output data.
       --oxtab                  Use XTAB format for output data.
       --pprint                 Use PPRINT format for input and output data.
       --tsv or -t              Use TSV format for input and output data.
       --tsvlite                Use TSV-lite format for input and output data.
       --usv or --usvlite       Use USV format for input and output data.
       --xtab                   Use XTAB format for input and output data.
       -i {format name}         Use format name for input data. For example: `-i csv`
                                is the same as `--icsv`.
       -o {format name}         Use format name for output data. For example: `-o
                                csv` is the same as `--ocsv`.

FLATTEN-UNFLATTEN FLAGS
       These flags control how Miller converts record values which are maps or arrays, when input is JSON and output is non-JSON (flattening) or input is non-JSON and output is JSON (unflattening).

       See the Flatten/unflatten doc page for more information.

       --flatsep or --jflatsep {string}
                                Separator for flattening multi-level JSON keys, e.g.
                                `{"a":{"b":3}}` becomes `a:b => 3` for non-JSON
                                formats. Defaults to `.`.
       --no-auto-flatten        When output is non-JSON, suppress the default
                                auto-flatten behavior. Default: if `$y = [7,8,9]`
                                then this flattens to `y.1=7,y.2=8,y.3=9, and
                                similarly for maps. With `--no-auto-flatten`, instead
                                we get `$y=[1, 2, 3]`.
       --no-auto-unflatten      When input non-JSON and output is JSON, suppress the
                                default auto-unflatten behavior. Default: if the
                                input has `y.1=7,y.2=8,y.3=9` then this unflattens to
                                `$y=[7,8,9]`. flattens to `y.1=7,y.2=8,y.3=9. With
                                `--no-auto-flatten`, instead we get
                                `${y.1}=7,${y.2}=8,${y.3}=9`.
       --xvright                Right-justify values for XTAB format.

FORMAT-CONVERSION KEYSTROKE-SAVER FLAGS
       As keystroke-savers for format-conversion you may use the following.
       The letters c, t, j, l, d, n, x, p, and m refer to formats CSV, TSV, DKVP, NIDX,
       JSON, JSON Lines, XTAB, PPRINT, and markdown, respectively. Note that markdown
       format is available for output only.

       | In\out | CSV   | TSV   | JSON   | JSONL  | DKVP   | NIDX   | XTAB   | PPRINT | Markdown |
       +--------+-------+-------+--------+--------+--------+--------+--------+----------+
       | CSV    |       | --c2t | --c2j  | --c2l  | --c2d  | --c2n  | --c2x  | --c2p  | --c2m    |
       | TSV    | --t2c |       | --t2j  | --t2l  | --t2d  | --t2n  | --t2x  | --t2p  | --t2m    |
       | JSON   | --j2c | --j2t |        | --j2l  | --j2d  | --j2n  | --j2x  | --j2p  | --j2m    |
       | JSONL  | --l2c | --l2t |        |        | --l2d  | --l2n  | --l2x  | --l2p  | --l2m    |
       | DKVP   | --d2c | --d2t | --d2j  | --d2l  |        | --d2n  | --d2x  | --d2p  | --d2m    |
       | NIDX   | --n2c | --n2t | --n2j  | --n2l  | --n2d  |        | --n2x  | --n2p  | --n2m    |
       | XTAB   | --x2c | --x2t | --x2j  | --x2l  | --x2d  | --x2n  |        | --x2p  | --x2m    |
       | PPRINT | --p2c | --p2t | --p2j  | --p2l  | --p2d  | --p2n  | --p2x  |        | --p2m    |

       -p                       Keystroke-saver for `--nidx --fs space --repifs`.
       -T                       Keystroke-saver for `--nidx --fs tab`.

LEGACY FLAGS
       These are flags which don't do anything in the current Miller version.
       They are accepted as no-op flags in order to keep old scripts from breaking.

       --jknquoteint            Type information from JSON input files is now
                                preserved throughout the processing stream.
       --jlistwrap or --jl      Wrap JSON output in outermost `[ ]`. This is the
                                default for JSON output format.
       --jquoteall              Type information from JSON input files is now
                                preserved throughout the processing stream.
       --json-fatal-arrays-on-input
                                Miller now supports arrays as of version 6.
       --json-map-arrays-on-input
                                Miller now supports arrays as of version 6.
       --json-skip-arrays-on-input
                                Miller now supports arrays as of version 6.
       --jsonx                  The `--jvstack` flag is now default true in Miller 6.
       --jvquoteall             Type information from JSON input files is now
                                preserved throughout the processing stream.
       --jvstack                Put one key-value pair per line for JSON output
                                (multi-line output). This is the default for JSON
                                output format.
       --mmap                   Miller no longer uses memory-mapping to access data
                                files.
       --no-jlistwrap           Wrap JSON output in outermost `[ ]`. This is the
                                default for JSON Lines output format.
       --no-jvstack             Put objects/arrays all on one line for JSON output.
                                This is the default for JSON Lines output format.
       --no-mmap                Miller no longer uses memory-mapping to access data
                                files.
       --ojsonx                 The `--jvstack` flag is now default true in Miller 6.
       --quote-all              Ignored as of version 6. Types are inferred/retained
                                through the processing flow now.
       --quote-minimal          Ignored as of version 6. Types are inferred/retained
                                through the processing flow now.
       --quote-none             Ignored as of version 6. Types are inferred/retained
                                through the processing flow now.
       --quote-numeric          Ignored as of version 6. Types are inferred/retained
                                through the processing flow now.
       --quote-original         Ignored as of version 6. Types are inferred/retained
                                through the processing flow now.
       --vflatsep               Ignored as of version 6. This functionality is
                                subsumed into JSON formatting.

MISCELLANEOUS FLAGS
       These are flags which don't fit into any other category.
       --fflush                 Force buffered output to be written after every
                                output record. The default is flush output after
                                every record if the output is to the terminal, or
                                less often if the output is to a file or a pipe. The
                                default is a significant performance optimization for
                                large files. Use this flag to force frequent updates
                                even when output is to a pipe or file, at a
                                performance cost.
       --from {filename}        Use this to specify an input file before the verb(s),
                                rather than after. May be used more than once.
                                Example: `mlr --from a.dat --from b.dat cat` is the
                                same as `mlr cat a.dat b.dat`.
       --hash-records           This is an internal parameter which normally does not
                                need to be modified. It controls the mechanism by
                                which Miller accesses fields within records. In
                                general --no-hash-records is faster, and is the
                                default. For specific use-cases involving data having
                                many fields, and many of them being processed during
                                a given processing run, --hash-records might offer a
                                slight performance benefit.
       --infer-int-as-float or -A
                                Cast all integers in data files to floats.
       --infer-none or -S       Don't treat values like 123 or 456.7 in data files as
                                int/float; leave them as strings.
       --infer-octal or -O      Treat numbers like 0123 in data files as numeric;
                                default is string. Note that 00--07 etc scan as int;
                                08-09 scan as float.
       --load {filename}        Load DSL script file for all put/filter operations on
                                the command line. If the name following `--load` is a
                                directory, load all `*.mlr` files in that directory.
                                This is just like `put -f` and `filter -f` except
                                it's up-front on the command line, so you can do
                                something like `alias mlr='mlr --load ~/myscripts'`
                                if you like.
       --mfrom {filenames}      Use this to specify one of more input files before
                                the verb(s), rather than after. May be used more than
                                once. The list of filename must end with `--`. This
                                is useful for example since `--from *.csv` doesn't do
                                what you might hope but `--mfrom *.csv --` does.
       --mload {filenames}      Like `--load` but works with more than one filename,
                                e.g. `--mload *.mlr --`.
       --no-dedupe-field-names  By default, if an input record has a field named `x`
                                and another also named `x`, the second will be
                                renamed `x_2`, and so on. With this flag provided,
                                the second `x`'s value will replace the first `x`'s
                                value when the record is read. This flag has no
                                effect on JSON input records, where duplicate keys
                                always result in the last one's value being retained.
       --no-fflush              Let buffered output not be written after every output
                                record. The default is flush output after every
                                record if the output is to the terminal, or less
                                often if the output is to a file or a pipe. The
                                default is a significant performance optimization for
                                large files. Use this flag to allow less-frequent
                                updates when output is to the terminal. This is
                                unlikely to be a noticeable performance improvement,
                                since direct-to-screen output for large files has its
                                own overhead.
       --no-hash-records        See --hash-records.
       --nr-progress-mod {m}    With m a positive integer: print filename and record
                                count to os.Stderr every m input records.
       --ofmt {format}          E.g. `%.18f`, `%.0f`, `%9.6e`. Please use
                                sprintf-style codes (https://pkg.go.dev/fmt) for
                                floating-point numbers. If not specified, default
                                formatting is used. See also the `fmtnum` function
                                and the `format-values` verb.
       --records-per-batch {n}  This is an internal parameter for maximum number of
                                records in a batch size. Normally this does not need
                                to be modified.
       --seed {n}               with `n` of the form `12345678` or `0xcafefeed`. For
                                `put`/`filter` `urand`, `urandint`, and `urand32`.
       --tz {timezone}          Specify timezone, overriding `$TZ` environment
                                variable (if any).
       -I                       Process files in-place. For each file name on the
                                command line, output is written to a temp file in the
                                same directory, which is then renamed over the
                                original. Each file is processed in isolation: if the
                                output format is CSV, CSV headers will be present in
                                each output file, statistics are only over each
                                file's own records; and so on.
       -n                       Process no input files, nor standard input either.
                                Useful for `mlr put` with `begin`/`end` statements
                                only. (Same as `--from /dev/null`.) Also useful in
                                `mlr -n put -v '...'` for analyzing abstract syntax
                                trees (if that's your thing).
       -s {file name}           Take command-line flags from file name. For more
                                information please see
                                https://miller.readthedocs.io/en/latest/scripting/.

OUTPUT-COLORIZATION FLAGS
       Miller uses colors to highlight outputs. You can specify color preferences.
       Note: output colorization does not work on Windows.

       Things having colors:

       * Keys in CSV header lines, JSON keys, etc
       * Values in CSV data lines, JSON scalar values, etc in regression-test output
       * Some online-help strings

       Rules for coloring:

       * By default, colorize output only if writing to stdout and stdout is a TTY.
           * Example: color: `mlr --csv cat foo.csv`
           * Example: no color: `mlr --csv cat foo.csv > bar.csv`
           * Example: no color: `mlr --csv cat foo.csv | less`
       * The default colors were chosen since they look OK with white or black
         terminal background, and are differentiable with common varieties of human
         color vision.

       Mechanisms for coloring:

       * Miller uses ANSI escape sequences only. This does not work on Windows
         except within Cygwin.
       * Requires `TERM` environment variable to be set to non-empty string.
       * Doesn't try to check to see whether the terminal is capable of 256-color
         ANSI vs 16-color ANSI. Note that if colors are in the range 0..15
         then 16-color ANSI escapes are used, so this is in the user's control.

       How you can control colorization:

       * Suppression/unsuppression:
           * Environment variable `export MLR_NO_COLOR=true` means don't color
             even if stdout+TTY.
           * Environment variable `export MLR_ALWAYS_COLOR=true` means do color
             even if not stdout+TTY.
             For example, you might want to use this when piping mlr output to `less -r`.
           * Command-line flags `--no-color` or `-M`, `--always-color` or `-C`.

       * Color choices can be specified by using environment variables, or command-line
         flags, with values 0..255:
           * `export MLR_KEY_COLOR=208`, `MLR_VALUE_COLOR=33`, etc.:
               `MLR_KEY_COLOR` `MLR_VALUE_COLOR` `MLR_PASS_COLOR` `MLR_FAIL_COLOR`
               `MLR_REPL_PS1_COLOR` `MLR_REPL_PS2_COLOR` `MLR_HELP_COLOR`
           * Command-line flags `--key-color 208`, `--value-color 33`, etc.:
               `--key-color` `--value-color` `--pass-color` `--fail-color`
               `--repl-ps1-color` `--repl-ps2-color` `--help-color`
           * This is particularly useful if your terminal's background color clashes
             with current settings.

       If environment-variable settings and command-line flags are both provided, the
       latter take precedence.

       Colors can be specified using names such as "red" or "orchid": please see
       `mlr --list-color-names` to see available names. They can also be specified using
       numbers in the range 0..255, like 170: please see `mlr --list-color-codes`.
       You can also use "bold", "underline", and/or "reverse". Additionally, combinations of
       those can be joined with a "-", like "red-bold", "bold-170", "bold-underline", etc.

       --always-color or -C     Instructs Miller to colorize output even when it
                                normally would not. Useful for piping output to `less
                                -r`.
       --fail-color             Specify the color (see `--list-color-codes` and
                                `--list-color-names`) for failing cases in `mlr
                                regtest`.
       --help-color             Specify the color (see `--list-color-codes` and
                                `--list-color-names`) for highlights in `mlr help`
                                output.
       --key-color              Specify the color (see `--list-color-codes` and
                                `--list-color-names`) for record keys.
       --list-color-codes       Show the available color codes in the range 0..255,
                                such as 170 for example.
       --list-color-names       Show the names for the available color codes, such as
                                `orchid` for example.
       --no-color or -M         Instructs Miller to not colorize any output.
       --pass-color             Specify the color (see `--list-color-codes` and
                                `--list-color-names`) for passing cases in `mlr
                                regtest`.
       --value-color            Specify the color (see `--list-color-codes` and
                                `--list-color-names`) for record values.

PPRINT-ONLY FLAGS
       These are flags which are applicable to PPRINT output format.

       --barred                 Prints a border around PPRINT output (not available
                                for input).
       --right                  Right-justifies all fields for PPRINT output.

PROFILING FLAGS
       These are flags for profiling Miller performance.
       --cpuprofile {CPU-profile file name}
                                Create a CPU-profile file for performance analysis.
                                Instructions will be printed to stderr. This flag
                                must be the very first thing after 'mlr' on the
                                command line.
       --time                   Print elapsed execution time in seconds to stderr at
                                the end of the execution of the program.
       --traceprofile           Create a trace-profile file for performance analysis.
                                Instructions will be printed to stderr. This flag
                                must be the very first thing after 'mlr' on the
                                command line.

SEPARATOR FLAGS
       See the Separators doc page for more about record separators, field
       separators, and pair separators. Also see the File formats doc page, or
       `mlr help file-formats`, for more about the file formats Miller supports.

       In brief:

       * For DKVP records like `x=1,y=2,z=3`, the fields are separated by a comma,
         the key-value pairs are separated by a comma, and each record is separated
         from the next by a newline.
       * Each file format has its own default separators.
       * Most formats, such as CSV, don't support pair-separators: keys are on the CSV
         header line and values are on each CSV data line; keys and values are not
         placed next to one another.
       * Some separators are not programmable: for example JSON uses a colon as a
         pair separator but this is non-modifiable in the JSON spec.
       * You can set separators differently between Miller's input and output --
         hence `--ifs` and `--ofs`, etc.

       Notes about line endings:

       * Default line endings (`--irs` and `--ors`) are newline
         which is interpreted to accept carriage-return/newline files (e.g. on Windows)
         for input, and to produce platform-appropriate line endings on output.

       Notes about all other separators:

       * IPS/OPS are only used for DKVP and XTAB formats, since only in these formats
         do key-value pairs appear juxtaposed.
       * IRS/ORS are ignored for XTAB format. Nominally IFS and OFS are newlines;
         XTAB records are separated by two or more consecutive IFS/OFS -- i.e.
         a blank line. Everything above about `--irs/--ors/--rs auto` becomes `--ifs/--ofs/--fs`
         auto for XTAB format. (XTAB's default IFS/OFS are "auto".)
       * OFS must be single-character for PPRINT format. This is because it is used
         with repetition for alignment; multi-character separators would make
         alignment impossible.
       * OPS may be multi-character for XTAB format, in which case alignment is
         disabled.
       * FS/PS are ignored for markdown format; RS is used.
       * All FS and PS options are ignored for JSON format, since they are not relevant
         to the JSON format.
       * You can specify separators in any of the following ways, shown by example:
         - Type them out, quoting as necessary for shell escapes, e.g.
           `--fs '|' --ips :`
         - C-style escape sequences, e.g. `--rs '\r\n' --fs '\t'`.
         - To avoid backslashing, you can use any of the following names:

                 ascii_esc  = "\x1b"
                 ascii_etx  = "\x04"
                 ascii_fs   = "\x1c"
                 ascii_gs   = "\x1d"
                 ascii_null = "\x01"
                 ascii_rs   = "\x1e"
                 ascii_soh  = "\x02"
                 ascii_stx  = "\x03"
                 ascii_us   = "\x1f"
                 asv_fs     = "\x1f"
                 asv_rs     = "\x1e"
                 colon      = ":"
                 comma      = ","
                 cr         = "\r"
                 crcr       = "\r\r"
                 crlf       = "\r\n"
                 crlfcrlf   = "\r\n\r\n"
                 equals     = "="
                 lf         = "\n"
                 lflf       = "\n\n"
                 newline    = "\n"
                 pipe       = "|"
                 semicolon  = ";"
                 slash      = "/"
                 space      = " "
                 tab        = "\t"
                 usv_fs     = "\xe2\x90\x9f"
                 usv_rs     = "\xe2\x90\x9e"

         - Similarly, you can use the following for `--ifs-regex` and `--ips-regex`:

                 spaces     = "( )+"
                 tabs       = "(\t)+"
                 whitespace = "([ \t])+"

       * Default separators by format:

               Format   FS     PS     RS
               csv      ","    N/A    "\n"
               csvlite  ","    N/A    "\n"
               dkvp     ","    "="    "\n"
               json     N/A    N/A    N/A
               markdown " "    N/A    "\n"
               nidx     " "    N/A    "\n"
               pprint   " "    N/A    "\n"
               tsv      "  "    N/A    "\n"
               xtab     "\n"   " "    "\n\n"

       --fs {string}            Specify FS for input and output.
       --ifs {string}           Specify FS for input.
       --ifs-regex {string}     Specify FS for input as a regular expression.
       --ips {string}           Specify PS for input.
       --ips-regex {string}     Specify PS for input as a regular expression.
       --irs {string}           Specify RS for input.
       --ofs {string}           Specify FS for output.
       --ops {string}           Specify PS for output.
       --ors {string}           Specify RS for output.
       --ps {string}            Specify PS for input and output.
       --repifs                 Let IFS be repeated: e.g. for splitting on multiple
                                spaces.
       --rs {string}            Specify RS for input and output.

AUXILIARY COMMANDS
       Available subcommands:
         aux-list
         hex
         lecat
         termcvt
         unhex
         help
         regtest
         repl
         version
       For more information, please invoke mlr {subcommand} --help.

MLRRC
       You can set up personal defaults via a $HOME/.mlrrc and/or ./.mlrrc.
       For example, if you usually process CSV, then you can put "--csv" in your .mlrrc file
       and that will be the default input/output format unless otherwise specified on the command line.

       The .mlrrc file format is one "--flag" or "--option value" per line, with the leading "--" optional.
       Hash-style comments and blank lines are ignored.

       Sample .mlrrc:
       # Input and output formats are CSV by default (unless otherwise specified
       # on the mlr command line):
       csv
       # These are no-ops for CSV, but when I do use JSON output, I want these
       # pretty-printing options to be used:
       jvstack
       jlistwrap

       How to specify location of .mlrrc:
       * If $MLRRC is set:
         o If its value is "__none__" then no .mlrrc files are processed.
         o Otherwise, its value (as a filename) is loaded and processed. If there are syntax
           errors, they abort mlr with a usage message (as if you had mistyped something on the
           command line). If the file can't be loaded at all, though, it is silently skipped.
         o Any .mlrrc in your home directory or current directory is ignored whenever $MLRRC is
           set in the environment.
       * Otherwise:
         o If $HOME/.mlrrc exists, it's then processed as above.
         o If ./.mlrrc exists, it's then also processed as above.
         (I.e. current-directory .mlrrc defaults are stacked over home-directory .mlrrc defaults.)
       * The command-line flag "--norc" can be used to suppress loading the .mlrrc file even when other
         conditions are met.
       See also:
       https://miller.readthedocs.io/en/latest/customization.html

REPL
       Usage: mlr repl [options] {zero or more data-file names}
       -v Prints the expressions's AST (abstract syntax tree), which gives
          full transparency on the precedence and associativity rules of
          Miller's grammar, to stdout.

       -d Like -v but uses a parenthesized-expression format for the AST.

       -D Like -d but with output all on one line.

       -w Show warnings about uninitialized variables

       -q Don't show startup banner

       -s Don't show prompts

       --load {DSL script file} Load script file before presenting the prompt.
          If the name following --load is a directory, load all "*.mlr" files
          in that directory.

       --mload {DSL script files} -- Like --load but works with more than one filename,
          e.g. '--mload *.mlr --'.

       -h|--help Show this message.

       Or any --icsv, --ojson, etc. reader/writer options as for the main Miller command line.

       Any data-file names are opened just as if you had waited and typed :open {filenames}
       at the Miller REPL prompt.

VERBS
   altkv
       Usage: mlr altkv [options]
       Given fields with values of the form a,b,c,d,e,f emits a=b,c=d,e=f pairs.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   bar
       Usage: mlr bar [options]
       Replaces a numeric field with a number of asterisks, allowing for cheesy
       bar plots. These align best with --opprint or --oxtab output format.
       Options:
       -f   {a,b,c}      Field names to convert to bars.
       --lo {lo}         Lower-limit value for min-width bar: default '0.000000'.
       --hi {hi}         Upper-limit value for max-width bar: default '100.000000'.
       -w   {n}          Bar-field width: default '40'.
       --auto            Automatically computes limits, ignoring --lo and --hi.
                         Holds all records in memory before producing any output.
       -c   {character}  Fill character: default '*'.
       -x   {character}  Out-of-bounds character: default '#'.
       -b   {character}  Blank character: default '.'.
       Nominally the fill, out-of-bounds, and blank characters will be strings of length 1.
       However you can make them all longer if you so desire.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   bootstrap
       Usage: mlr bootstrap [options]
       Emits an n-sample, with replacement, of the input records.
       See also mlr sample and mlr shuffle.
       Options:
        -n Number of samples to output. Defaults to number of input records.
           Must be non-negative.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   cat
       Usage: mlr cat [options]
       Passes input records directly to output. Most useful for format conversion.
       Options:
       -n         Prepend field "n" to each record with record-counter starting at 1.
       -N {name}  Prepend field {name} to each record with record-counter starting at 1.
       -g {a,b,c} Optional group-by-field names for counters, e.g. a,b,c
       -h|--help Show this message.

   check
       Usage: mlr check [options]
       Consumes records without printing any output.
       Useful for doing a well-formatted check on input data.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   clean-whitespace
       Usage: mlr clean-whitespace [options]
       For each record, for each field in the record, whitespace-cleans the keys and/or
       values. Whitespace-cleaning entails stripping leading and trailing whitespace,
       and replacing multiple whitespace with singles. For finer-grained control,
       please see the DSL functions lstrip, rstrip, strip, collapse_whitespace,
       and clean_whitespace.

       Options:
       -k|--keys-only    Do not touch values.
       -v|--values-only  Do not touch keys.
       It is an error to specify -k as well as -v -- to clean keys and values,
       leave off -k as well as -v.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   count-distinct
       Usage: mlr count-distinct [options]
       Prints number of records having distinct values for specified field names.
       Same as uniq -c.

       Options:
       -f {a,b,c}    Field names for distinct count.
       -n            Show only the number of distinct values. Not compatible with -u.
       -o {name}     Field name for output count. Default "count".
                     Ignored with -u.
       -u            Do unlashed counts for multiple field names. With -f a,b and
                     without -u, computes counts for distinct combinations of a
                     and b field values. With -f a,b and with -u, computes counts
                     for distinct a field values and counts for distinct b field
                     values separately.

   count
       Usage: mlr count [options]
       Prints number of records, optionally grouped by distinct values for specified field names.
       Options:
       -g {a,b,c} Optional group-by-field names for counts, e.g. a,b,c
       -n {n} Show only the number of distinct values. Not interesting without -g.
       -o {name} Field name for output-count. Default "count".
       -h|--help Show this message.

   count-similar
       Usage: mlr count-similar [options]
       Ingests all records, then emits each record augmented by a count of
       the number of other records having the same group-by field values.
       Options:
       -g {a,b,c} Group-by-field names for counts, e.g. a,b,c
       -o {name} Field name for output-counts. Defaults to "count".
       -h|--help Show this message.

   cut
       Usage: mlr cut [options]
       Passes through input records with specified fields included/excluded.
       Options:
        -f {a,b,c} Comma-separated field names for cut, e.g. a,b,c.
        -o Retain fields in the order specified here in the argument list.
           Default is to retain them in the order found in the input data.
        -x|--complement  Exclude, rather than include, field names specified by -f.
        -r Treat field names as regular expressions. "ab", "a.*b" will
          match any field name containing the substring "ab" or matching
          "a.*b", respectively; anchors of the form "^ab$", "^a.*b$" may
          be used. The -o flag is ignored when -r is present.
       -h|--help Show this message.
       Examples:
         mlr cut -f hostname,status
         mlr cut -x -f hostname,status
         mlr cut -r -f '^status$,sda[0-9]'
         mlr cut -r -f '^status$,"sda[0-9]"'
         mlr cut -r -f '^status$,"sda[0-9]"i' (this is case-insensitive)

   decimate
       Usage: mlr decimate [options]
       Passes through one of every n records, optionally by category.
       Options:
        -b Decimate by printing first of every n.
        -e Decimate by printing last of every n (default).
        -g {a,b,c} Optional group-by-field names for decimate counts, e.g. a,b,c.
        -n {n} Decimation factor (default 10).
       -h|--help Show this message.

   fill-down
       Usage: mlr fill-down [options]
       If a given record has a missing value for a given field, fill that from
       the corresponding value from a previous record, if any.
       By default, a 'missing' field either is absent, or has the empty-string value.
       With -a, a field is 'missing' only if it is absent.

       Options:
        --all Operate on all fields in the input.
        -a|--only-if-absent If a given record has a missing value for a given field,
            fill that from the corresponding value from a previous record, if any.
            By default, a 'missing' field either is absent, or has the empty-string value.
            With -a, a field is 'missing' only if it is absent.
        -f  Field names for fill-down.
        -h|--help Show this message.

   fill-empty
       Usage: mlr fill-empty [options]
       Fills empty-string fields with specified fill-value.
       Options:
       -v {string} Fill-value: defaults to "N/A"
       -S          Don't infer type -- so '-v 0' would fill string 0 not int 0.

   filter
       Usage: mlr filter [options] {DSL expression}
       Options:
       -f {file name} File containing a DSL expression (see examples below). If the filename
          is a directory, all *.mlr files in that directory are loaded.

       -e {expression} You can use this after -f to add an expression. Example use
          case: define functions/subroutines in a file you specify with -f, then call
          them with an expression you specify with -e.

       (If you mix -e and -f then the expressions are evaluated in the order encountered.
       Since the expression pieces are simply concatenated, please be sure to use intervening
       semicolons to separate expressions.)

       -s name=value: Predefines out-of-stream variable @name to have
           Thus mlr put -s foo=97 '$column += @foo' is like
           mlr put 'begin {@foo = 97} $column += @foo'.
           The value part is subject to type-inferencing.
           May be specified more than once, e.g. -s name1=value1 -s name2=value2.
           Note: the value may be an environment variable, e.g. -s sequence=$SEQUENCE

       -x (default false) Prints records for which {expression} evaluates to false, not true,
          i.e. invert the sense of the filter expression.

       -q Does not include the modified record in the output stream.
          Useful for when all desired output is in begin and/or end blocks.

       -S and -F: There are no-ops in Miller 6 and above, since now type-inferencing is done
          by the record-readers before filter/put is executed. Supported as no-op pass-through
          flags for backward compatibility.

       -h|--help Show this message.

       Parser-info options:

       -w Print warnings about things like uninitialized variables.

       -W Same as -w, but exit the process if there are any warnings.

       -p Prints the expressions's AST (abstract syntax tree), which gives full
         transparency on the precedence and associativity rules of Miller's grammar,
         to stdout.

       -d Like -p but uses a parenthesized-expression format for the AST.

       -D Like -d but with output all on one line.

       -E Echo DSL expression before printing parse-tree

       -v Same as -E -p.

       -X Exit after parsing but before stream-processing. Useful with -v/-d/-D, if you
          only want to look at parser information.

       Records will pass the filter depending on the last bare-boolean statement in
       the DSL expression. That can be the result of <, ==, >, etc., the return value of a function call
       which returns boolean, etc.

       Examples:
         mlr --csv --from example.csv filter '$color == "red"'
         mlr --csv --from example.csv filter '$color == "red" && flag == true'
       More example filter expressions:
         First record in each file:
           'FNR == 1'
         Subsampling:
           'urand() < 0.001'
         Compound booleans:
           '$color != "blue" && $value > 4.2'
           '($x < 0.5 && $y < 0.5) || ($x > 0.5 && $y > 0.5)'
         Regexes with case-insensitive flag
           '($name =~ "^sys.*east$") || ($name =~ "^dev.[0-9]+"i)'
         Assignments, then bare-boolean filter statement:
           '$ab = $a+$b; $cd = $c+$d; $ab != $cd'
         Bare-boolean filter statement within a conditional:
           'if (NR < 100) {
             $x > 0.3;
           } else {
             $x > 0.002;
           }
           '
         Using 'any' higher-order function to see if $index is 10, 20, or 30:
           'any([10,20,30], func(e) {return $index == e})'

       See also https://miller.readthedocs.io/reference-dsl for more context.

   flatten
       Usage: mlr flatten [options]
       Flattens multi-level maps to single-level ones. Example: field with name 'a'
       and value '{"b": { "c": 4 }}' becomes name 'a.b.c' and value 4.
       Options:
       -f Comma-separated list of field names to flatten (default all).
       -s Separator, defaulting to mlr --flatsep value.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   format-values
       Usage: mlr format-values [options]
       Applies format strings to all field values, depending on autodetected type.
       * If a field value is detected to be integer, applies integer format.
       * Else, if a field value is detected to be float, applies float format.
       * Else, applies string format.

       Note: this is a low-keystroke way to apply formatting to many fields. To get
       finer control, please see the fmtnum function within the mlr put DSL.

       Note: this verb lets you apply arbitrary format strings, which can produce
       undefined behavior and/or program crashes.  See your system's "man printf".

       Options:
       -i {integer format} Defaults to "%d".
                           Examples: "%06lld", "%08llx".
                           Note that Miller integers are long long so you must use
                           formats which apply to long long, e.g. with ll in them.
                           Undefined behavior results otherwise.
       -f {float format}   Defaults to "%f".
                           Examples: "%8.3lf", "%.6le".
                           Note that Miller floats are double-precision so you must
                           use formats which apply to double, e.g. with l[efg] in them.
                           Undefined behavior results otherwise.
       -s {string format}  Defaults to "%s".
                           Examples: "_%s", "%08s".
                           Note that you must use formats which apply to string, e.g.
                           with s in them. Undefined behavior results otherwise.
       -n                  Coerce field values autodetected as int to float, and then
                           apply the float format.

   fraction
       Usage: mlr fraction [options]
       For each record's value in specified fields, computes the ratio of that
       value to the sum of values in that field over all input records.
       E.g. with input records  x=1  x=2  x=3  and  x=4, emits output records
       x=1,x_fraction=0.1  x=2,x_fraction=0.2  x=3,x_fraction=0.3  and  x=4,x_fraction=0.4

       Note: this is internally a two-pass algorithm: on the first pass it retains
       input records and accumulates sums; on the second pass it computes quotients
       and emits output records. This means it produces no output until all input is read.

       Options:
       -f {a,b,c}    Field name(s) for fraction calculation
       -g {d,e,f}    Optional group-by-field name(s) for fraction counts
       -p            Produce percents [0..100], not fractions [0..1]. Output field names
                     end with "_percent" rather than "_fraction"
       -c            Produce cumulative distributions, i.e. running sums: each output
                     value folds in the sum of the previous for the specified group
                     E.g. with input records  x=1  x=2  x=3  and  x=4, emits output records
                     x=1,x_cumulative_fraction=0.1  x=2,x_cumulative_fraction=0.3
                     x=3,x_cumulative_fraction=0.6  and  x=4,x_cumulative_fraction=1.0

   gap
       Usage: mlr gap [options]
       Emits an empty record every n records, or when certain values change.
       Options:
       Emits an empty record every n records, or when certain values change.
       -g {a,b,c} Print a gap whenever values of these fields (e.g. a,b,c) changes.
       -n {n} Print a gap every n records.
       One of -f or -g is required.
       -n is ignored if -g is present.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   grep
       Usage: mlr grep [options] {regular expression}
       Passes through records which match the regular expression.
       Options:
       -i  Use case-insensitive search.
       -v  Invert: pass through records which do not match the regex.
       -h|--help Show this message.
       Note that "mlr filter" is more powerful, but requires you to know field names.
       By contrast, "mlr grep" allows you to regex-match the entire record. It does
       this by formatting each record in memory as DKVP, using command-line-specified
       ORS/OFS/OPS, and matching the resulting line against the regex specified
       here. In particular, the regex is not applied to the input stream: if you
       have CSV with header line "x,y,z" and data line "1,2,3" then the regex will
       be matched, not against either of these lines, but against the DKVP line
       "x=1,y=2,z=3".  Furthermore, not all the options to system grep are supported,
       and this command is intended to be merely a keystroke-saver. To get all the
       features of system grep, you can do
         "mlr --odkvp ... | grep ... | mlr --idkvp ..."

   group-by
       Usage: mlr group-by [options] {comma-separated field names}
       Outputs records in batches having identical values at specified field names.Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   group-like
       Usage: mlr group-like [options]
       Outputs records in batches having identical field names.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   having-fields
       Usage: mlr having-fields [options]
       Conditionally passes through records depending on each record's field names.
       Options:
         --at-least      {comma-separated names}
         --which-are     {comma-separated names}
         --at-most       {comma-separated names}
         --all-matching  {regular expression}
         --any-matching  {regular expression}
         --none-matching {regular expression}
       Examples:
         mlr having-fields --which-are amount,status,owner
         mlr having-fields --any-matching 'sda[0-9]'
         mlr having-fields --any-matching '"sda[0-9]"'
         mlr having-fields --any-matching '"sda[0-9]"i' (this is case-insensitive)

   head
       Usage: mlr head [options]
       Passes through the first n records, optionally by category.
       Without -g, ceases consuming more input (i.e. is fast) when n records have been read.
       Options:
       -g {a,b,c} Optional group-by-field names for head counts, e.g. a,b,c.
       -n {n} Head-count to print. Default 10.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   histogram
       Just a histogram. Input values < lo or > hi are not counted.
       Usage: mlr histogram [options]
       -f {a,b,c}    Value-field names for histogram counts
       --lo {lo}     Histogram low value
       --hi {hi}     Histogram high value
       --nbins {n}   Number of histogram bins. Defaults to 20.
       --auto        Automatically computes limits, ignoring --lo and --hi.
                     Holds all values in memory before producing any output.
       -o {prefix}   Prefix for output field name. Default: no prefix.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   json-parse
       Usage: mlr json-parse [options]
       Tries to convert string field values to parsed JSON, e.g. "[1,2,3]" -> [1,2,3].
       Options:
       -f {...} Comma-separated list of field names to json-parse (default all).
       -h|--help Show this message.

   json-stringify
       Usage: mlr json-stringify [options]
       Produces string field values from field-value data, e.g. [1,2,3] -> "[1,2,3]".
       Options:
       -f {...} Comma-separated list of field names to json-parse (default all).
       --jvstack Produce multi-line JSON output.
       --no-jvstack Produce single-line JSON output per record (default).
       -h|--help Show this message.

   join
       Usage: mlr join [options]
       Joins records from specified left file name with records from all file names
       at the end of the Miller argument list.
       Functionality is essentially the same as the system "join" command, but for
       record streams.
       Options:
         -f {left file name}
         -j {a,b,c}   Comma-separated join-field names for output
         -l {a,b,c}   Comma-separated join-field names for left input file;
                      defaults to -j values if omitted.
         -r {a,b,c}   Comma-separated join-field names for right input file(s);
                      defaults to -j values if omitted.
         --lk|--left-keep-field-names {a,b,c} If supplied, this means keep only the specified field
                      names from the left file. Automatically includes the join-field name(s). Helpful
                      for when you only want a limited subset of information from the left file.
         --lp {text}  Additional prefix for non-join output field names from
                      the left file
         --rp {text}  Additional prefix for non-join output field names from
                      the right file(s)
         --np         Do not emit paired records
         --ul         Emit unpaired records from the left file
         --ur         Emit unpaired records from the right file(s)
         -s|--sorted-input  Require sorted input: records must be sorted
                      lexically by their join-field names, else not all records will
                      be paired. The only likely use case for this is with a left
                      file which is too big to fit into system memory otherwise.
         -u           Enable unsorted input. (This is the default even without -u.)
                      In this case, the entire left file will be loaded into memory.
         --prepipe {command} As in main input options; see mlr --help for details.
                      If you wish to use a prepipe command for the main input as well
                      as here, it must be specified there as well as here.
         --prepipex {command} Likewise.
       File-format options default to those for the right file names on the Miller
       argument list, but may be overridden for the left file as follows. Please see
       the main "mlr --help" for more information on syntax for these arguments:
         -i {one of csv,dkvp,nidx,pprint,xtab}
         --irs {record-separator character}
         --ifs {field-separator character}
         --ips {pair-separator character}
         --repifs
         --implicit-csv-header
         --implicit-tsv-header
         --no-implicit-csv-header
         --no-implicit-tsv-header
       For example, if you have 'mlr --csv ... join -l foo ... ' then the left-file format will
       be specified CSV as well unless you override with 'mlr --csv ... join --ijson -l foo' etc.
       Likewise, if you have 'mlr --csv --implicit-csv-header ...' then the join-in file will be
       expected to be headerless as well unless you put '--no-implicit-csv-header' after 'join'.
       Please use "mlr --usage-separator-options" for information on specifying separators.
       Please see https://miller.readthedocs.io/en/latest/reference-verbs.html#join for more information
       including examples.

   label
       Usage: mlr label [options] {new1,new2,new3,...}
       Given n comma-separated names, renames the first n fields of each record to
       have the respective name. (Fields past the nth are left with their original
       names.) Particularly useful with --inidx or --implicit-csv-header, to give
       useful names to otherwise integer-indexed fields.

       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   latin1-to-utf8
       Usage: mlr latin1-to-utf8, with no options.
       Recursively converts record strings from Latin-1 to UTF-8.
       For field-level control, please see the latin1_to_utf8 DSL function.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   utf8-to-latin1
       Usage: mlr utf8-to-latin1, with no options.
       Recursively converts record strings from Latin-1 to UTF-8.
       For field-level control, please see the utf8_to_latin1 DSL function.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   least-frequent
       Usage: mlr least-frequent [options]
       Shows the least frequently occurring distinct values for specified field names.
       The first entry is the statistical anti-mode; the remaining are runners-up.
       Options:
       -f {one or more comma-separated field names}. Required flag.
       -n {count}. Optional flag defaulting to 10.
       -b          Suppress counts; show only field values.
       -o {name}   Field name for output count. Default "count".
       See also "mlr most-frequent".

   merge-fields
       Usage: mlr merge-fields [options]
       Computes univariate statistics for each input record, accumulated across
       specified fields.
       Options:
       -a {sum,count,...}  Names of accumulators. One or more of:
         count    Count instances of fields
         mode     Find most-frequently-occurring values for fields; first-found wins tie
         antimode Find least-frequently-occurring values for fields; first-found wins tie
         sum      Compute sums of specified fields
         mean     Compute averages (sample means) of specified fields
         var      Compute sample variance of specified fields
         stddev   Compute sample standard deviation of specified fields
         meaneb   Estimate error bars for averages (assuming no sample autocorrelation)
         skewness Compute sample skewness of specified fields
         kurtosis Compute sample kurtosis of specified fields
         min      Compute minimum values of specified fields
         max      Compute maximum values of specified fields
       -f {a,b,c}  Value-field names on which to compute statistics. Requires -o.
       -r {a,b,c}  Regular expressions for value-field names on which to compute
                   statistics. Requires -o.
       -c {a,b,c}  Substrings for collapse mode. All fields which have the same names
                   after removing substrings will be accumulated together. Please see
                   examples below.
       -i          Use interpolated percentiles, like R's type=7; default like type=1.
                   Not sensical for string-valued fields.
       -o {name}   Output field basename for -f/-r.
       -k          Keep the input fields which contributed to the output statistics;
                   the default is to omit them.

       String-valued data make sense unless arithmetic on them is required,
       e.g. for sum, mean, interpolated percentiles, etc. In case of mixed data,
       numbers are less than strings.

       Example input data: "a_in_x=1,a_out_x=2,b_in_y=4,b_out_x=8".
       Example: mlr merge-fields -a sum,count -f a_in_x,a_out_x -o foo
         produces "b_in_y=4,b_out_x=8,foo_sum=3,foo_count=2" since "a_in_x,a_out_x" are
         summed over.
       Example: mlr merge-fields -a sum,count -r in_,out_ -o bar
         produces "bar_sum=15,bar_count=4" since all four fields are summed over.
       Example: mlr merge-fields -a sum,count -c in_,out_
         produces "a_x_sum=3,a_x_count=2,b_y_sum=4,b_y_count=1,b_x_sum=8,b_x_count=1"
         since "a_in_x" and "a_out_x" both collapse to "a_x", "b_in_y" collapses to
         "b_y", and "b_out_x" collapses to "b_x".

   most-frequent
       Usage: mlr most-frequent [options]
       Shows the most frequently occurring distinct values for specified field names.
       The first entry is the statistical mode; the remaining are runners-up.
       Options:
       -f {one or more comma-separated field names}. Required flag.
       -n {count}. Optional flag defaulting to 10.
       -b          Suppress counts; show only field values.
       -o {name}   Field name for output count. Default "count".
       See also "mlr least-frequent".

   nest
       Usage: mlr nest [options]
       Explodes specified field values into separate fields/records, or reverses this.
       Options:
         --explode,--implode   One is required.
         --values,--pairs      One is required.
         --across-records,--across-fields One is required.
         -f {field name}       Required.
         --nested-fs {string}  Defaults to ";". Field separator for nested values.
         --nested-ps {string}  Defaults to ":". Pair separator for nested key-value pairs.
         --evar {string}       Shorthand for --explode --values ---across-records --nested-fs {string}
         --ivar {string}       Shorthand for --implode --values ---across-records --nested-fs {string}
       Please use "mlr --usage-separator-options" for information on specifying separators.

       Examples:

         mlr nest --explode --values --across-records -f x
         with input record "x=a;b;c,y=d" produces output records
           "x=a,y=d"
           "x=b,y=d"
           "x=c,y=d"
         Use --implode to do the reverse.

         mlr nest --explode --values --across-fields -f x
         with input record "x=a;b;c,y=d" produces output records
           "x_1=a,x_2=b,x_3=c,y=d"
         Use --implode to do the reverse.

         mlr nest --explode --pairs --across-records -f x
         with input record "x=a:1;b:2;c:3,y=d" produces output records
           "a=1,y=d"
           "b=2,y=d"
           "c=3,y=d"

         mlr nest --explode --pairs --across-fields -f x
         with input record "x=a:1;b:2;c:3,y=d" produces output records
           "a=1,b=2,c=3,y=d"

       Notes:
       * With --pairs, --implode doesn't make sense since the original field name has
         been lost.
       * The combination "--implode --values --across-records" is non-streaming:
         no output records are produced until all input records have been read. In
         particular, this means it won't work in tail -f contexts. But all other flag
         combinations result in streaming (tail -f friendly) data processing.
       * It's up to you to ensure that the nested-fs is distinct from your data's IFS:
         e.g. by default the former is semicolon and the latter is comma.
       See also mlr reshape.

   nothing
       Usage: mlr nothing [options]
       Drops all input records. Useful for testing, or after tee/print/etc. have
       produced other output.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   put
       Usage: mlr put [options] {DSL expression}
       Options:
       -f {file name} File containing a DSL expression (see examples below). If the filename
          is a directory, all *.mlr files in that directory are loaded.

       -e {expression} You can use this after -f to add an expression. Example use
          case: define functions/subroutines in a file you specify with -f, then call
          them with an expression you specify with -e.

       (If you mix -e and -f then the expressions are evaluated in the order encountered.
       Since the expression pieces are simply concatenated, please be sure to use intervening
       semicolons to separate expressions.)

       -s name=value: Predefines out-of-stream variable @name to have
           Thus mlr put -s foo=97 '$column += @foo' is like
           mlr put 'begin {@foo = 97} $column += @foo'.
           The value part is subject to type-inferencing.
           May be specified more than once, e.g. -s name1=value1 -s name2=value2.
           Note: the value may be an environment variable, e.g. -s sequence=$SEQUENCE

       -x (default false) Prints records for which {expression} evaluates to false, not true,
          i.e. invert the sense of the filter expression.

       -q Does not include the modified record in the output stream.
          Useful for when all desired output is in begin and/or end blocks.

       -S and -F: There are no-ops in Miller 6 and above, since now type-inferencing is done
          by the record-readers before filter/put is executed. Supported as no-op pass-through
          flags for backward compatibility.

       -h|--help Show this message.

       Parser-info options:

       -w Print warnings about things like uninitialized variables.

       -W Same as -w, but exit the process if there are any warnings.

       -p Prints the expressions's AST (abstract syntax tree), which gives full
         transparency on the precedence and associativity rules of Miller's grammar,
         to stdout.

       -d Like -p but uses a parenthesized-expression format for the AST.

       -D Like -d but with output all on one line.

       -E Echo DSL expression before printing parse-tree

       -v Same as -E -p.

       -X Exit after parsing but before stream-processing. Useful with -v/-d/-D, if you
          only want to look at parser information.

       Examples:
         mlr --from example.csv put '$qr = $quantity * $rate'
       More example put expressions:
         If-statements:
           'if ($flag == true) { $quantity *= 10}'
           'if ($x > 0.0 { $y=log10($x); $z=sqrt($y) } else {$y = 0.0; $z = 0.0}'
         Newly created fields can be read after being written:
           '$new_field = $index**2; $qn = $quantity * $new_field'
         Regex-replacement:
           '$name = sub($name, "http.*com"i, "")'
         Regex-capture:
           'if ($a =~ "([a-z]+)_([0-9]+)) { $b = "left_\1"; $c = "right_\2" }'
         Built-in variables:
           '$filename = FILENAME'
         Aggregations (use mlr put -q):
           '@sum += $x; end {emit @sum}'
           '@sum[$shape] += $quantity; end {emit @sum, "shape"}'
           '@sum[$shape][$color] += $x; end {emit @sum, "shape", "color"}'
           '
             @min = min(@min,$x);
             @max=max(@max,$x);
             end{emitf @min, @max}
           '

       See also https://miller.readthedocs.io/reference-dsl for more context.

   regularize
       Usage: mlr regularize [options]
       Outputs records sorted lexically ascending by keys.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   remove-empty-columns
       Usage: mlr remove-empty-columns [options]
       Omits fields which are empty on every input row. Non-streaming.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   rename
       Usage: mlr rename [options] {old1,new1,old2,new2,...}
       Renames specified fields.
       Options:
       -r         Treat old field  names as regular expressions. "ab", "a.*b"
                  will match any field name containing the substring "ab" or
                  matching "a.*b", respectively; anchors of the form "^ab$",
                  "^a.*b$" may be used. New field names may be plain strings,
                  or may contain capture groups of the form "\1" through
                  "\9". Wrapping the regex in double quotes is optional, but
                  is required if you wish to follow it with 'i' to indicate
                  case-insensitivity.
       -g         Do global replacement within each field name rather than
                  first-match replacement.
       -h|--help Show this message.
       Examples:
       mlr rename old_name,new_name'
       mlr rename old_name_1,new_name_1,old_name_2,new_name_2'
       mlr rename -r 'Date_[0-9]+,Date,'  Rename all such fields to be "Date"
       mlr rename -r '"Date_[0-9]+",Date' Same
       mlr rename -r 'Date_([0-9]+).*,\1' Rename all such fields to be of the form 20151015
       mlr rename -r '"name"i,Name'       Rename "name", "Name", "NAME", etc. to "Name"

   reorder
       Usage: mlr reorder [options]
       Moves specified names to start of record, or end of record.
       Options:
       -e Put specified field names at record end: default is to put them at record start.
       -f {a,b,c} Field names to reorder.
       -b {x}     Put field names specified with -f before field name specified by {x},
                  if any. If {x} isn't present in a given record, the specified fields
                  will not be moved.
       -a {x}     Put field names specified with -f after field name specified by {x},
                  if any. If {x} isn't present in a given record, the specified fields
                  will not be moved.
       -h|--help Show this message.

       Examples:
       mlr reorder    -f a,b sends input record "d=4,b=2,a=1,c=3" to "a=1,b=2,d=4,c=3".
       mlr reorder -e -f a,b sends input record "d=4,b=2,a=1,c=3" to "d=4,c=3,a=1,b=2".

   repeat
       Usage: mlr repeat [options]
       Copies input records to output records multiple times.
       Options must be exactly one of the following:
       -n {repeat count}  Repeat each input record this many times.
       -f {field name}    Same, but take the repeat count from the specified
                          field name of each input record.
       -h|--help Show this message.
       Example:
         echo x=0 | mlr repeat -n 4 then put '$x=urand()'
       produces:
        x=0.488189
        x=0.484973
        x=0.704983
        x=0.147311
       Example:
         echo a=1,b=2,c=3 | mlr repeat -f b
       produces:
         a=1,b=2,c=3
         a=1,b=2,c=3
       Example:
         echo a=1,b=2,c=3 | mlr repeat -f c
       produces:
         a=1,b=2,c=3
         a=1,b=2,c=3
         a=1,b=2,c=3

   reshape
       Usage: mlr reshape [options]
       Wide-to-long options:
         -i {input field names}   -o {key-field name,value-field name}
         -r {input field regexes} -o {key-field name,value-field name}
         These pivot/reshape the input data such that the input fields are removed
         and separate records are emitted for each key/value pair.
         Note: this works with tail -f and produces output records for each input
         record seen.
       Long-to-wide options:
         -s {key-field name,value-field name}
         These pivot/reshape the input data to undo the wide-to-long operation.
         Note: this does not work with tail -f; it produces output records only after
         all input records have been read.

       Examples:

         Input file "wide.txt":
           time       X           Y
           2009-01-01 0.65473572  2.4520609
           2009-01-02 -0.89248112 0.2154713
           2009-01-03 0.98012375  1.3179287

         mlr --pprint reshape -i X,Y -o item,value wide.txt
           time       item value
           2009-01-01 X    0.65473572
           2009-01-01 Y    2.4520609
           2009-01-02 X    -0.89248112
           2009-01-02 Y    0.2154713
           2009-01-03 X    0.98012375
           2009-01-03 Y    1.3179287

         mlr --pprint reshape -r '[A-Z]' -o item,value wide.txt
           time       item value
           2009-01-01 X    0.65473572
           2009-01-01 Y    2.4520609
           2009-01-02 X    -0.89248112
           2009-01-02 Y    0.2154713
           2009-01-03 X    0.98012375
           2009-01-03 Y    1.3179287

         Input file "long.txt":
           time       item value
           2009-01-01 X    0.65473572
           2009-01-01 Y    2.4520609
           2009-01-02 X    -0.89248112
           2009-01-02 Y    0.2154713
           2009-01-03 X    0.98012375
           2009-01-03 Y    1.3179287

         mlr --pprint reshape -s item,value long.txt
           time       X           Y
           2009-01-01 0.65473572  2.4520609
           2009-01-02 -0.89248112 0.2154713
           2009-01-03 0.98012375  1.3179287
       See also mlr nest.

   sample
       Usage: mlr sample [options]
       Reservoir sampling (subsampling without replacement), optionally by category.
       See also mlr bootstrap and mlr shuffle.
       Options:
       -g {a,b,c} Optional: group-by-field names for samples, e.g. a,b,c.
       -k {k} Required: number of records to output in total, or by group if using -g.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   sec2gmtdate
       Usage: ../c/mlr sec2gmtdate {comma-separated list of field names}
       Replaces a numeric field representing seconds since the epoch with the
       corresponding GMT year-month-day timestamp; leaves non-numbers as-is.
       This is nothing more than a keystroke-saver for the sec2gmtdate function:
         ../c/mlr sec2gmtdate time1,time2
       is the same as
         ../c/mlr put '$time1=sec2gmtdate($time1);$time2=sec2gmtdate($time2)'

   sec2gmt
       Usage: mlr sec2gmt [options] {comma-separated list of field names}
       Replaces a numeric field representing seconds since the epoch with the
       corresponding GMT timestamp; leaves non-numbers as-is. This is nothing
       more than a keystroke-saver for the sec2gmt function:
         mlr sec2gmt time1,time2
       is the same as
         mlr put '$time1 = sec2gmt($time1); $time2 = sec2gmt($time2)'
       Options:
       -1 through -9: format the seconds using 1..9 decimal places, respectively.
       --millis Input numbers are treated as milliseconds since the epoch.
       --micros Input numbers are treated as microseconds since the epoch.
       --nanos  Input numbers are treated as nanoseconds since the epoch.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   seqgen
       Usage: mlr seqgen [options]
       Passes input records directly to output. Most useful for format conversion.
       Produces a sequence of counters.  Discards the input record stream. Produces
       output as specified by the options

       Options:
       -f {name} (default "i") Field name for counters.
       --start {value} (default 1) Inclusive start value.
       --step {value} (default 1) Step value.
       --stop {value} (default 100) Inclusive stop value.
       -h|--help Show this message.
       Start, stop, and/or step may be floating-point. Output is integer if start,
       stop, and step are all integers. Step may be negative. It may not be zero
       unless start == stop.

   shuffle
       Usage: mlr shuffle [options]
       Outputs records randomly permuted. No output records are produced until
       all input records are read. See also mlr bootstrap and mlr sample.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   skip-trivial-records
       Usage: mlr skip-trivial-records [options]
       Passes through all records except those with zero fields,
       or those for which all fields have empty value.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   sort
       Usage: mlr sort {flags}
       Sorts records primarily by the first specified field, secondarily by the second
       field, and so on.  (Any records not having all specified sort keys will appear
       at the end of the output, in the order they were encountered, regardless of the
       specified sort order.) The sort is stable: records that compare equal will sort
       in the order they were encountered in the input record stream.

       Options:
       -f  {comma-separated field names}  Lexical ascending
       -r  {comma-separated field names}  Lexical descending
       -c  {comma-separated field names}  Case-folded lexical ascending
       -cr {comma-separated field names}  Case-folded lexical descending
       -n  {comma-separated field names}  Numerical ascending; nulls sort last
       -nf {comma-separated field names}  Same as -n
       -nr {comma-separated field names}  Numerical descending; nulls sort first
       -t  {comma-separated field names}  Natural ascending
       -tr {comma-separated field names}  Natural descending
       -h|--help Show this message.

       Example:
         mlr sort -f a,b -nr x,y,z
       which is the same as:
         mlr sort -f a -f b -nr x -nr y -nr z

   sort-within-records
       Usage: mlr sort-within-records [options]
       Outputs records sorted lexically ascending by keys.
       Options:
       -r        Recursively sort subobjects/submaps, e.g. for JSON input.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   split
       Usage: mlr split [options] {filename}
       Options:
       -n {n}:      Cap file sizes at N records.
       -m {m}:      Produce M files, round-robining records among them.
       -g {a,b,c}:  Write separate files with records having distinct values for fields named a,b,c.
       Exactly one  of -m, -n, or -g must be supplied.
       --prefix {p} Specify filename prefix; default "split".
       --suffix {s} Specify filename suffix; default is from mlr output format, e.g. "csv".
       -a           Append to existing file(s), if any, rather than overwriting.
       -v           Send records along to downstream verbs as well as splitting to files.
       -h|--help    Show this message.
       Any of the output-format command-line flags (see mlr -h). For example, using
         mlr --icsv --from myfile.csv split --ojson -n 1000
       the input is CSV, but the output files are JSON.

       Examples: Suppose myfile.csv has 1,000,000 records.

       100 output files, 10,000 records each. First 10,000 records in split_1.csv, next in split_2.csv, etc.
         mlr --csv --from myfile.csv split -n 10000

       10 output files, 100,000 records each. Records 1,11,21,etc in split_1.csv, records 2,12,22, etc in split_2.csv, etc.
         mlr --csv --from myfile.csv split -m 10
       Same, but with JSON output.
         mlr --csv --from myfile.csv split -m 10 -o json

       Same but instead of split_1.csv, split_2.csv, etc. there are test_1.dat, test_2.dat, etc.
         mlr --csv --from myfile.csv split -m 10 --prefix test --suffix dat
       Same, but written to the /tmp/ directory.
         mlr --csv --from myfile.csv split -m 10 --prefix /tmp/test --suffix dat

       If the shape field has values triangle and square, then there will be split_triangle.csv and split_square.csv.
         mlr --csv --from myfile.csv split -g shape

       If the color field has values yellow and green, and the shape field has values triangle and square,
       then there will be split_yellow_triangle.csv, split_yellow_square.csv, etc.
         mlr --csv --from myfile.csv split -g color,shape

       See also the "tee" DSL function which lets you do more ad-hoc customization.

   stats1
       Usage: mlr stats1 [options]
       Computes univariate statistics for one or more given fields, accumulated across
       the input record stream.
       Options:
       -a {sum,count,...} Names of accumulators: one or more of:
         median   This is the same as p50
         p10 p25.2 p50 p98 p100 etc.
         count    Count instances of fields
         mode     Find most-frequently-occurring values for fields; first-found wins tie
         antimode Find least-frequently-occurring values for fields; first-found wins tie
         sum      Compute sums of specified fields
         mean     Compute averages (sample means) of specified fields
         var      Compute sample variance of specified fields
         stddev   Compute sample standard deviation of specified fields
         meaneb   Estimate error bars for averages (assuming no sample autocorrelation)
         skewness Compute sample skewness of specified fields
         kurtosis Compute sample kurtosis of specified fields
         min      Compute minimum values of specified fields
         max      Compute maximum values of specified fields

       -f {a,b,c}     Value-field names on which to compute statistics
       --fr {regex}   Regex for value-field names on which to compute statistics
                      (compute statistics on values in all field names matching regex
       --fx {regex}   Inverted regex for value-field names on which to compute statistics
                      (compute statistics on values in all field names not matching regex)

       -g {d,e,f}     Optional group-by-field names
       --gr {regex}   Regex for optional group-by-field names
                      (group by values in field names matching regex)
       --gx {regex}   Inverted regex for optional group-by-field names
                      (group by values in field names not matching regex)

       --grfx {regex} Shorthand for --gr {regex} --fx {that same regex}

       -i             Use interpolated percentiles, like R's type=7; default like type=1.
                      Not sensical for string-valued fields.\n");
       -s             Print iterative stats. Useful in tail -f contexts (in which
                      case please avoid pprint-format output since end of input
                      stream will never be seen).
       -h|--help      Show this message.
       Example: mlr stats1 -a min,p10,p50,p90,max -f value -g size,shape
       Example: mlr stats1 -a count,mode -f size
       Example: mlr stats1 -a count,mode -f size -g shape
       Example: mlr stats1 -a count,mode --fr '^[a-h].*$' -gr '^k.*$'
               This computes count and mode statistics on all field names beginning
                with a through h, grouped by all field names starting with k.

       Notes:
       * p50 and median are synonymous.
       * min and max output the same results as p0 and p100, respectively, but use
         less memory.
       * String-valued data make sense unless arithmetic on them is required,
         e.g. for sum, mean, interpolated percentiles, etc. In case of mixed data,
         numbers are less than strings.
       * count and mode allow text input; the rest require numeric input.
         In particular, 1 and 1.0 are distinct text for count and mode.
       * When there are mode ties, the first-encountered datum wins.

   stats2
       Usage: mlr stats2 [options]
       Computes bivariate statistics for one or more given field-name pairs,
       accumulated across the input record stream.
       -a {linreg-ols,corr,...}  Names of accumulators: one or more of:
         linreg-ols Linear regression using ordinary least squares
         linreg-pca Linear regression using principal component analysis
         r2       Quality metric for linreg-ols (linreg-pca emits its own)
         logireg  Logistic regression
         corr     Sample correlation
         cov      Sample covariance
         covx     Sample-covariance matrix
       -f {a,b,c,d}   Value-field name-pairs on which to compute statistics.
                      There must be an even number of names.
       -g {e,f,g}     Optional group-by-field names.
       -v             Print additional output for linreg-pca.
       -s             Print iterative stats. Useful in tail -f contexts (in which
                      case please avoid pprint-format output since end of input
                      stream will never be seen).
       --fit          Rather than printing regression parameters, applies them to
                      the input data to compute new fit fields. All input records are
                      held in memory until end of input stream. Has effect only for
                      linreg-ols, linreg-pca, and logireg.
       Only one of -s or --fit may be used.
       Example: mlr stats2 -a linreg-pca -f x,y
       Example: mlr stats2 -a linreg-ols,r2 -f x,y -g size,shape
       Example: mlr stats2 -a corr -f x,y

   step
       Usage: mlr step [options]
       Computes values dependent on earlier/later records, optionally grouped by category.
       Options:
       -a {delta,rsum,...} Names of steppers: comma-separated, one or more of:
         counter    Count instances of field(s) between successive records
         delta      Compute differences in field(s) between successive records
         ewma       Exponentially weighted moving average over successive records
         from-first Compute differences in field(s) from first record
         ratio      Compute ratios in field(s) between successive records
         rsum       Compute running sums of field(s) between successive records
         shift      Alias for shift_lag
         shift_lag  Include value(s) in field(s) from the previous record, if any
         shift_lead Include value(s) in field(s) from the next record, if any
         slwin      Sliding-window averages over m records back and n forward. E.g. slwin_7_2 for 7 back and 2 forward.

       -f {a,b,c}   Value-field names on which to compute statistics
       -g {d,e,f}   Optional group-by-field names
       -F           Computes integerable things (e.g. counter) in floating point.
                    As of Miller 6 this happens automatically, but the flag is accepted
                    as a no-op for backward compatibility with Miller 5 and below.
       -d {x,y,z}   Weights for EWMA. 1 means current sample gets all weight (no
                    smoothing), near under under 1 is light smoothing, near over 0 is
                    heavy smoothing. Multiple weights may be specified, e.g.
                    "mlr step -a ewma -f sys_load -d 0.01,0.1,0.9". Default if omitted
                    is "-d 0.5".
       -o {a,b,c}   Custom suffixes for EWMA output fields. If omitted, these default to
                    the -d values. If supplied, the number of -o values must be the same
                    as the number of -d values.
       -h|--help   Show this message.

       Examples:
         mlr step -a rsum -f request_size
         mlr step -a delta -f request_size -g hostname
         mlr step -a ewma -d 0.1,0.9 -f x,y
         mlr step -a ewma -d 0.1,0.9 -o smooth,rough -f x,y
         mlr step -a ewma -d 0.1,0.9 -o smooth,rough -f x,y -g group_name
         mlr step -a slwin_9_0,slwin_0_9 -f x

       Please see https://miller.readthedocs.io/en/latest/reference-verbs.html#filter or
       https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moving_average#Exponential_moving_average
       for more information on EWMA.

   tac
       Usage: mlr tac [options]
       Prints records in reverse order from the order in which they were encountered.
       Options:
       -h|--help Show this message.

   tail
       Usage: mlr tail [options]
       Passes through the last n records, optionally by category.
       Options:
       -g {a,b,c} Optional group-by-field names for head counts, e.g. a,b,c.
       -n {n} Head-count to print. Default 10.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   tee
       Usage: mlr tee [options] {filename}
       Options:
       -a    Append to existing file, if any, rather than overwriting.
       -p    Treat filename as a pipe-to command.
       Any of the output-format command-line flags (see mlr -h). Example: using
         mlr --icsv --opprint put '...' then tee --ojson ./mytap.dat then stats1 ...
       the input is CSV, the output is pretty-print tabular, but the tee-file output
       is written in JSON format.

       -h|--help Show this message.

   template
       Usage: mlr template [options]
       Places input-record fields in the order specified by list of column names.
       If the input record is missing a specified field, it will be filled with the fill-with.
       If the input record possesses an unspecified field, it will be discarded.
       Options:
        -f {a,b,c} Comma-separated field names for template, e.g. a,b,c.
        -t {filename} CSV file whose header line will be used for template.
       --fill-with {filler string}  What to fill absent fields with. Defaults to the empty string.
       -h|--help Show this message.
       Example:
       * Specified fields are a,b,c.
       * Input record is c=3,a=1,f=6.
       * Output record is a=1,b=,c=3.

   top
       Usage: mlr top [options]
       -f {a,b,c}    Value-field names for top counts.
       -g {d,e,f}    Optional group-by-field names for top counts.
       -n {count}    How many records to print per category; default 1.
       -a            Print all fields for top-value records; default is
                     to print only value and group-by fields. Requires a single
                     value-field name only.
       --min         Print top smallest values; default is top largest values.
       -F            Keep top values as floats even if they look like integers.
       -o {name}     Field name for output indices. Default "top_idx".
                     This is ignored if -a is used.
       Prints the n records with smallest/largest values at specified fields,
       optionally by category. If -a is given, then the top records are emitted
       with the same fields as they appeared in the input. Without -a, only fields
       from -f, fields from -g, and the top-index field are emitted. For more information
       please see https://miller.readthedocs.io/en/latest/reference-verbs#top

   unflatten
       Usage: mlr unflatten [options]
       Reverses flatten. Example: field with name 'a.b.c' and value 4
       becomes name 'a' and value '{"b": { "c": 4 }}'.
       Options:
       -f {a,b,c} Comma-separated list of field names to unflatten (default all).
       -s {string} Separator, defaulting to mlr --flatsep value.
       -h|--help Show this message.

   uniq
       Usage: mlr uniq [options]
       Prints distinct values for specified field names. With -c, same as
       count-distinct. For uniq, -f is a synonym for -g.

       Options:
       -g {d,e,f}    Group-by-field names for uniq counts.
       -c            Show repeat counts in addition to unique values.
       -n            Show only the number of distinct values.
       -o {name}     Field name for output count. Default "count".
       -a            Output each unique record only once. Incompatible with -g.
                     With -c, produces unique records, with repeat counts for each.
                     With -n, produces only one record which is the unique-record count.
                     With neither -c nor -n, produces unique records.

   unsparsify
       Usage: mlr unsparsify [options]
       Prints records with the union of field names over all input records.
       For field names absent in a given record but present in others, fills in
       a value. This verb retains all input before producing any output.
       Options:
       --fill-with {filler string}  What to fill absent fields with. Defaults to
                                    the empty string.
       -f {a,b,c} Specify field names to be operated on. Any other fields won't be
                  modified, and operation will be streaming.
       -h|--help  Show this message.
       Example: if the input is two records, one being 'a=1,b=2' and the other
       being 'b=3,c=4', then the output is the two records 'a=1,b=2,c=' and
       'a=,b=3,c=4'.

FUNCTIONS FOR FILTER/PUT
   abs
        (class=math #args=1) Absolute value.

   acos
        (class=math #args=1) Inverse trigonometric cosine.

   acosh
        (class=math #args=1) Inverse hyperbolic cosine.

   any
        (class=higher-order-functions #args=2) Given a map or array as first argument and a function as second argument, yields a boolean true if the argument function returns true for any array/map element, false otherwise. For arrays, the function should take one argument, for array element; for maps, it should take two, for map-element key and value. In either case it should return a boolean.
       Examples:
       Array example: any([10,20,30], func(e) {return $index == e})
       Map example: any({"a": "foo", "b": "bar"}, func(k,v) {return $[k] == v})

   append
        (class=collections #args=2) Appends second argument to end of first argument, which must be an array.

   apply
        (class=higher-order-functions #args=2) Given a map or array as first argument and a function as second argument, applies the function to each element of the array/map. For arrays, the function should take one argument, for array element; it should return a new element. For maps, it should take two arguments, for map-element key and value; it should return a new key-value pair (i.e. a single-entry map).
       Examples:
       Array example: apply([1,2,3,4,5], func(e) {return e ** 3}) returns [1, 8, 27, 64, 125].
       Map example: apply({"a":1, "b":3, "c":5}, func(k,v) {return {toupper(k): v ** 2}}) returns {"A": 1, "B":9, "C": 25}",

   arrayify
        (class=collections #args=1) Walks through a nested map/array, converting any map with consecutive keys "1", "2", ... into an array. Useful to wrap the output of unflatten.

   asin
        (class=math #args=1) Inverse trigonometric sine.

   asinh
        (class=math #args=1) Inverse hyperbolic sine.

   asserting_absent
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_absent on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_array
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_array on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_bool
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_bool on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_boolean
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_boolean on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_empty
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_empty on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_empty_map
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_empty_map on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_error
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_error on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_float
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_float on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_int
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_int on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_map
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_map on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_nonempty_map
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_nonempty_map on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_not_array
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_not_array on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_not_empty
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_not_empty on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_not_map
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_not_map on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_not_null
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_not_null on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_null
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_null on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_numeric
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_numeric on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_present
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_present on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   asserting_string
        (class=typing #args=1) Aborts with an error if is_string on the argument returns false, else returns its argument.

   atan
        (class=math #args=1) One-argument arctangent.

   atan2
        (class=math #args=2) Two-argument arctangent.

   atanh
        (class=math #args=1) Inverse hyperbolic tangent.

   bitcount
        (class=arithmetic #args=1) Count of 1-bits.

   boolean
        (class=conversion #args=1) Convert int/float/bool/string to boolean.

   capitalize
        (class=string #args=1) Convert string's first character to uppercase.

   cbrt
        (class=math #args=1) Cube root.

   ceil
        (class=math #args=1) Ceiling: nearest integer at or above.

   clean_whitespace
        (class=string #args=1) Same as collapse_whitespace and strip.

   collapse_whitespace
        (class=string #args=1) Strip repeated whitespace from string.

   concat
        (class=collections #args=variadic) Returns the array concatenation of the arguments. Non-array arguments are treated as single-element arrays.
       Examples:
       concat(1,2,3) is [1,2,3]
       concat([1,2],3) is [1,2,3]
       concat([1,2],[3]) is [1,2,3]

   cos
        (class=math #args=1) Trigonometric cosine.

   cosh
        (class=math #args=1) Hyperbolic cosine.

   depth
        (class=collections #args=1) Prints maximum depth of map/array. Scalars have depth 0.

   dhms2fsec
        (class=time #args=1) Recovers floating-point seconds as in dhms2fsec("5d18h53m20.250000s") = 500000.250000

   dhms2sec
        (class=time #args=1) Recovers integer seconds as in dhms2sec("5d18h53m20s") = 500000

   erf
        (class=math #args=1) Error function.

   erfc
        (class=math #args=1) Complementary error function.

   every
        (class=higher-order-functions #args=2) Given a map or array as first argument and a function as second argument, yields a boolean true if the argument function returns true for every array/map element, false otherwise. For arrays, the function should take one argument, for array element; for maps, it should take two, for map-element key and value. In either case it should return a boolean.
       Examples:
       Array example: every(["a", "b", "c"], func(e) {return $[e] >= 0})
       Map example: every({"a": "foo", "b": "bar"}, func(k,v) {return $[k] == v})

   exp
        (class=math #args=1) Exponential function e**x.

   expm1
        (class=math #args=1) e**x - 1.

   flatten
        (class=collections #args=2,3) Flattens multi-level maps to single-level ones. Useful for nested JSON-like structures for non-JSON file formats like CSV. With two arguments, the first argument is a map (maybe $*) and the second argument is the flatten separator. With three arguments, the first argument is prefix, the second is the flatten separator, and the third argument is a map; flatten($*, ".") is the same as flatten("", ".", $*). See "Flatten/unflatten: converting between JSON and tabular formats" at https://miller.readthedocs.io for more information.
       Examples:
       flatten({"a":[1,2],"b":3}, ".") is {"a.1": 1, "a.2": 2, "b": 3}.
       flatten("a", ".", {"b": { "c": 4 }}) is {"a.b.c" : 4}.
       flatten("", ".", {"a": { "b": 3 }}) is {"a.b" : 3}.

   float
        (class=conversion #args=1) Convert int/float/bool/string to float.

   floor
        (class=math #args=1) Floor: nearest integer at or below.

   fmtifnum
        (class=conversion #args=2) Identical to fmtnum, except returns the first argument as-is if the output would be an error.
       Examples:
       fmtifnum(3.4, "%.6f") gives 3.400000"
       fmtifnum("abc", "%.6f") gives abc"
       $* = fmtifnum($*, "%.6f") formats numeric fields in the current record, leaving non-numeric ones alone

   fmtnum
        (class=conversion #args=2) Convert int/float/bool to string using printf-style format string (https://pkg.go.dev/fmt), e.g. '$s = fmtnum($n, "%08d")' or '$t = fmtnum($n, "%.6e")'. This function recurses on array and map values.
       Example:
       $x = fmtnum($x, "%.6f")

   fold
        (class=higher-order-functions #args=3) Given a map or array as first argument and a function as second argument, accumulates entries into a final output -- for example, sum or product. For arrays, the function should take two arguments, for accumulated value and array element. For maps, it should take four arguments, for accumulated key and value, and map-element key and value; it should return the updated accumulator as a new key-value pair (i.e. a single-entry map). The start value for the accumulator is taken from the third argument.
       Examples:
       Array example: fold([1,2,3,4,5], func(acc,e) {return acc + e**3}, 10000) returns 10225.
       Map example: fold({"a":1, "b":3, "c": 5}, func(acck,accv,ek,ev) {return {"sum": accv+ev**2}}, {"sum":10000}) returns 10035.

   format
        (class=string #args=variadic) Using first argument as format string, interpolate remaining arguments in place of each "{}" in the format string. Too-few arguments are treated as the empty string; too-many arguments are discarded.
       Examples:
       format("{}:{}:{}", 1,2)     gives "1:2:".
       format("{}:{}:{}", 1,2,3)   gives "1:2:3".
       format("{}:{}:{}", 1,2,3,4) gives "1:2:3".

   fsec2dhms
        (class=time #args=1) Formats floating-point seconds as in fsec2dhms(500000.25) = "5d18h53m20.250000s"

   fsec2hms
        (class=time #args=1) Formats floating-point seconds as in fsec2hms(5000.25) = "01:23:20.250000"

   get_keys
        (class=collections #args=1) Returns array of keys of map or array

   get_values
        (class=collections #args=1) Returns array of values of map or array -- in the latter case, returns a copy of the array

   gmt2localtime
        (class=time #args=1,2) Convert from a GMT-time string to a local-time string. Consulting $TZ unless second argument is supplied.
       Examples:
       gmt2localtime("1999-12-31T22:00:00Z") = "2000-01-01 00:00:00" with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       gmt2localtime("1999-12-31T22:00:00Z", "Asia/Istanbul") = "2000-01-01 00:00:00"

   gmt2sec
        (class=time #args=1) Parses GMT timestamp as integer seconds since the epoch.
       Example:
       gmt2sec("2001-02-03T04:05:06Z") = 981173106

   gssub
        (class=string #args=3) Like gsub but does no regexing. No characters are special.
       Example:
       gssub("ab.d.fg", ".", "X") gives "abXdXfg"

   gsub
        (class=string #args=3) '$name = gsub($name, "old", "new")': replace all, with support for regular expressions. Capture groups \1 through \9 in the new part are matched from (...) in the old part, and must be used within the same call to gsub -- they don't persist for subsequent DSL statements. See also =~ and regextract. See also "Regular expressions" at https://miller.readthedocs.io.
       Examples:
       gsub("ababab", "ab", "XY") gives "XYXYXY"
       gsub("abc.def", ".", "X") gives "XXXXXXX"
       gsub("abc.def", "\.", "X") gives "abcXdef"
       gsub("abcdefg", "[ce]", "X") gives "abXdXfg"
       gsub("prefix4529:suffix8567", "(....ix)([0-9]+)", "[\1 : \2]") gives "[prefix : 4529]:[suffix : 8567]"

   haskey
        (class=collections #args=2) True/false if map has/hasn't key, e.g. 'haskey($*, "a")' or 'haskey(mymap, mykey)', or true/false if array index is in bounds / out of bounds. Error if 1st argument is not a map or array. Note -n..-1 alias to 1..n in Miller arrays.

   hexfmt
        (class=conversion #args=1) Convert int to hex string, e.g. 255 to "0xff".

   hms2fsec
        (class=time #args=1) Recovers floating-point seconds as in hms2fsec("01:23:20.250000") = 5000.250000

   hms2sec
        (class=time #args=1) Recovers integer seconds as in hms2sec("01:23:20") = 5000

   hostname
        (class=system #args=0) Returns the hostname as a string.

   int
        (class=conversion #args=1) Convert int/float/bool/string to int.

   invqnorm
        (class=math #args=1) Inverse of normal cumulative distribution function. Note that invqorm(urand()) is normally distributed.

   is_absent
        (class=typing #args=1) False if field is present in input, true otherwise

   is_array
        (class=typing #args=1) True if argument is an array.

   is_bool
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present with boolean value. Synonymous with is_boolean.

   is_boolean
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present with boolean value. Synonymous with is_bool.

   is_empty
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present in input with empty string value, false otherwise.

   is_empty_map
        (class=typing #args=1) True if argument is a map which is empty.

   is_error
        (class=typing #args=1) True if if argument is an error, such as taking string length of an integer.

   is_float
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present with value inferred to be float

   is_int
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present with value inferred to be int

   is_map
        (class=typing #args=1) True if argument is a map.

   is_nan
        (class=typing #args=1) True if the argument is the NaN (not-a-number) floating-point value. Note that NaN has the property that NaN != NaN, so you need 'is_nan(x)' rather than 'x == NaN'.

   is_nonempty_map
        (class=typing #args=1) True if argument is a map which is non-empty.

   is_not_array
        (class=typing #args=1) True if argument is not an array.

   is_not_empty
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present in input with non-empty value, false otherwise

   is_not_map
        (class=typing #args=1) True if argument is not a map.

   is_not_null
        (class=typing #args=1) False if argument is null (empty, absent, or JSON null), true otherwise.

   is_null
        (class=typing #args=1) True if argument is null (empty, absent, or JSON null), false otherwise.

   is_numeric
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present with value inferred to be int or float

   is_present
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present in input, false otherwise.

   is_string
        (class=typing #args=1) True if field is present with string (including empty-string) value

   joink
        (class=conversion #args=2) Makes string from map/array keys. First argument is map/array; second is separator string.
       Examples:
       joink({"a":3,"b":4,"c":5}, ",") = "a,b,c".
       joink([1,2,3], ",") = "1,2,3".

   joinkv
        (class=conversion #args=3) Makes string from map/array key-value pairs. First argument is map/array; second is pair-separator string; third is field-separator string. Mnemonic: the "=" comes before the "," in the output and in the arguments to joinkv.
       Examples:
       joinkv([3,4,5], "=", ",") = "1=3,2=4,3=5"
       joinkv({"a":3,"b":4,"c":5}, ":", ";") = "a:3;b:4;c:5"

   joinv
        (class=conversion #args=2) Makes string from map/array values. First argument is map/array; second is separator string.
       Examples:
       joinv([3,4,5], ",") = "3,4,5"
       joinv({"a":3,"b":4,"c":5}, ",") = "3,4,5"

   json_parse
        (class=collections #args=1) Converts value from JSON-formatted string.

   json_stringify
        (class=collections #args=1,2) Converts value to JSON-formatted string. Default output is single-line. With optional second boolean argument set to true, produces multiline output.

   latin1_to_utf8
        (class=string #args=1) Tries to convert Latin-1-encoded string to UTF-8-encoded string. If argument is array or map, recurses into it.
       Examples:
       $y = latin1_to_utf8($x)
       $* = latin1_to_utf8($*)

   leafcount
        (class=collections #args=1) Counts total number of terminal values in map/array. For single-level map/array, same as length.

   length
        (class=collections #args=1) Counts number of top-level entries in array/map. Scalars have length 1.

   localtime2gmt
        (class=time #args=1,2) Convert from a local-time string to a GMT-time string. Consults $TZ unless second argument is supplied.
       Examples:
       localtime2gmt("2000-01-01 00:00:00") = "1999-12-31T22:00:00Z" with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       localtime2gmt("2000-01-01 00:00:00", "Asia/Istanbul") = "1999-12-31T22:00:00Z"

   localtime2sec
        (class=time #args=1,2) Parses local timestamp as integer seconds since the epoch. Consults $TZ environment variable, unless second argument is supplied.
       Examples:
       localtime2sec("2001-02-03 04:05:06") = 981165906 with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       localtime2sec("2001-02-03 04:05:06", "Asia/Istanbul") = 981165906"

   log
        (class=math #args=1) Natural (base-e) logarithm.

   log10
        (class=math #args=1) Base-10 logarithm.

   log1p
        (class=math #args=1) log(1-x).

   logifit
        (class=math #args=3) Given m and b from logistic regression, compute fit: $yhat=logifit($x,$m,$b).

   lstrip
        (class=string #args=1) Strip leading whitespace from string.

   madd
        (class=arithmetic #args=3) a + b mod m (integers)

   mapdiff
        (class=collections #args=variadic) With 0 args, returns empty map. With 1 arg, returns copy of arg. With 2 or more, returns copy of arg 1 with all keys from any of remaining argument maps removed.

   mapexcept
        (class=collections #args=variadic) Returns a map with keys from remaining arguments, if any, unset. Remaining arguments can be strings or arrays of string. E.g. 'mapexcept({1:2,3:4,5:6}, 1, 5, 7)' is '{3:4}' and 'mapexcept({1:2,3:4,5:6}, [1, 5, 7])' is '{3:4}'.

   mapselect
        (class=collections #args=variadic) Returns a map with only keys from remaining arguments set. Remaining arguments can be strings or arrays of string. E.g. 'mapselect({1:2,3:4,5:6}, 1, 5, 7)' is '{1:2,5:6}' and 'mapselect({1:2,3:4,5:6}, [1, 5, 7])' is '{1:2,5:6}'.

   mapsum
        (class=collections #args=variadic) With 0 args, returns empty map. With >= 1 arg, returns a map with key-value pairs from all arguments. Rightmost collisions win, e.g. 'mapsum({1:2,3:4},{1:5})' is '{1:5,3:4}'.

   max
        (class=math #args=variadic) Max of n numbers; null loses.

   md5
        (class=hashing #args=1) MD5 hash.

   mexp
        (class=arithmetic #args=3) a ** b mod m (integers)

   min
        (class=math #args=variadic) Min of n numbers; null loses.

   mmul
        (class=arithmetic #args=3) a * b mod m (integers)

   msub
        (class=arithmetic #args=3) a - b mod m (integers)

   os
        (class=system #args=0) Returns the operating-system name as a string.

   pow
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Exponentiation. Same as **, but as a function.

   qnorm
        (class=math #args=1) Normal cumulative distribution function.

   reduce
        (class=higher-order-functions #args=2) Given a map or array as first argument and a function as second argument, accumulates entries into a final output -- for example, sum or product. For arrays, the function should take two arguments, for accumulated value and array element, and return the accumulated element. For maps, it should take four arguments, for accumulated key and value, and map-element key and value; it should return the updated accumulator as a new key-value pair (i.e. a single-entry map). The start value for the accumulator is the first element for arrays, or the first element's key-value pair for maps.
       Examples:
       Array example: reduce([1,2,3,4,5], func(acc,e) {return acc + e**3}) returns 225.
       Map example: reduce({"a":1, "b":3, "c": 5}, func(acck,accv,ek,ev) {return {"sum_of_squares": accv + ev**2}}) returns {"sum_of_squares": 35}.

   regextract
        (class=string #args=2) Extracts a substring (the first, if there are multiple matches), matching a regular expression, from the input. Does not use capture groups; see also the =~ operator which does.
       Examples:
       regextract("index ab09 file", "[a-z][a-z][0-9][0-9]") gives "ab09"
       regextract("index a999 file", "[a-z][a-z][0-9][0-9]") gives (absent), which will result in an assignment not happening.

   regextract_or_else
        (class=string #args=3) Like regextract but the third argument is the return value in case the input string (first argument) doesn't match the pattern (second argument).
       Examples:
       regextract_or_else("index ab09 file", "[a-z][a-z][0-9][0-9]", "nonesuch") gives "ab09"
       regextract_or_else("index a999 file", "[a-z][a-z][0-9][0-9]", "nonesuch") gives "nonesuch"

   round
        (class=math #args=1) Round to nearest integer.

   roundm
        (class=math #args=2) Round to nearest multiple of m: roundm($x,$m) is the same as round($x/$m)*$m.

   rstrip
        (class=string #args=1) Strip trailing whitespace from string.

   sec2dhms
        (class=time #args=1) Formats integer seconds as in sec2dhms(500000) = "5d18h53m20s"

   sec2gmt
        (class=time #args=1,2) Formats seconds since epoch as GMT timestamp. Leaves non-numbers as-is. With second integer argument n, includes n decimal places for the seconds part.
       Examples:
       sec2gmt(1234567890)           = "2009-02-13T23:31:30Z"
       sec2gmt(1234567890.123456)    = "2009-02-13T23:31:30Z"
       sec2gmt(1234567890.123456, 6) = "2009-02-13T23:31:30.123456Z"

   sec2gmtdate
        (class=time #args=1) Formats seconds since epoch (integer part) as GMT timestamp with year-month-date. Leaves non-numbers as-is.
       Example:
       sec2gmtdate(1440768801.7) = "2015-08-28".

   sec2hms
        (class=time #args=1) Formats integer seconds as in sec2hms(5000) = "01:23:20"

   sec2localdate
        (class=time #args=1,2) Formats seconds since epoch (integer part) as local timestamp with year-month-date. Leaves non-numbers as-is. Consults $TZ environment variable unless second argument is supplied.
       Examples:
       sec2localdate(1440768801.7) = "2015-08-28" with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       sec2localdate(1440768801.7, "Asia/Istanbul") = "2015-08-28"

   sec2localtime
        (class=time #args=1,2,3) Formats seconds since epoch (integer part) as local timestamp. Consults $TZ environment variable unless third argument is supplied. Leaves non-numbers as-is. With second integer argument n, includes n decimal places for the seconds part
       Examples:
       sec2localtime(1234567890)           = "2009-02-14 01:31:30"        with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       sec2localtime(1234567890.123456)    = "2009-02-14 01:31:30"        with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       sec2localtime(1234567890.123456, 6) = "2009-02-14 01:31:30.123456" with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       sec2localtime(1234567890.123456, 6, "Asia/Istanbul") = "2009-02-14 01:31:30.123456"

   select
        (class=higher-order-functions #args=2) Given a map or array as first argument and a function as second argument, includes each input element in the output if the function returns true. For arrays, the function should take one argument, for array element; for maps, it should take two, for map-element key and value. In either case it should return a boolean.
       Examples:
       Array example: select([1,2,3,4,5], func(e) {return e >= 3}) returns [3, 4, 5].
       Map example: select({"a":1, "b":3, "c":5}, func(k,v) {return v >= 3}) returns {"b":3, "c": 5}.

   sgn
        (class=math #args=1) +1, 0, -1 for positive, zero, negative input respectively.

   sha1
        (class=hashing #args=1) SHA1 hash.

   sha256
        (class=hashing #args=1) SHA256 hash.

   sha512
        (class=hashing #args=1) SHA512 hash.

   sin
        (class=math #args=1) Trigonometric sine.

   sinh
        (class=math #args=1) Hyperbolic sine.

   sort
        (class=higher-order-functions #args=1-2) Given a map or array as first argument and string flags or function as optional second argument, returns a sorted copy of the input. With one argument, sorts array elements with numbers first numerically and then strings lexically, and map elements likewise by map keys. If the second argument is a string, it can contain any of "f" for lexical ("n" is for the above default), "c" for case-folded lexical, or "t" for natural sort order. An additional "r" in that string is for reverse. If the second argument is a function, then for arrays it should take two arguments a and b, returning < 0, 0, or > 0 as a < b, a == b, or a > b respectively; for maps the function should take four arguments ak, av, bk, and bv, again returning < 0, 0, or > 0, using a and b's keys and values.
       Examples:
       Default sorting: sort([3,"A",1,"B",22]) returns [1, 3, 20, "A", "B"].
         Note that this is numbers before strings.
       Default sorting: sort(["E","a","c","B","d"]) returns ["B", "E", "a", "c", "d"].
         Note that this is uppercase before lowercase.
       Case-folded ascending: sort(["E","a","c","B","d"], "c") returns ["a", "B", "c", "d", "E"].
       Case-folded descending: sort(["E","a","c","B","d"], "cr") returns ["E", "d", "c", "B", "a"].
       Natural sorting: sort(["a1","a10","a100","a2","a20","a200"], "t") returns ["a1", "a2", "a10", "a20", "a100", "a200"].
       Array with function: sort([5,2,3,1,4], func(a,b) {return b <=> a}) returns [5,4,3,2,1].
       Map with function: sort({"c":2,"a":3,"b":1}, func(ak,av,bk,bv) {return bv <=> av}) returns {"a":3,"c":2,"b":1}.

   splita
        (class=conversion #args=2) Splits string into array with type inference. First argument is string to split; second is the separator to split on.
       Example:
       splita("3,4,5", ",") = [3,4,5]

   splitax
        (class=conversion #args=2) Splits string into array without type inference. First argument is string to split; second is the separator to split on.
       Example:
       splitax("3,4,5", ",") = ["3","4","5"]

   splitkv
        (class=conversion #args=3) Splits string by separators into map with type inference. First argument is string to split; second argument is pair separator; third argument is field separator.
       Example:
       splitkv("a=3,b=4,c=5", "=", ",") = {"a":3,"b":4,"c":5}

   splitkvx
        (class=conversion #args=3) Splits string by separators into map without type inference (keys and values are strings). First argument is string to split; second argument is pair separator; third argument is field separator.
       Example:
       splitkvx("a=3,b=4,c=5", "=", ",") = {"a":"3","b":"4","c":"5"}

   splitnv
        (class=conversion #args=2) Splits string by separator into integer-indexed map with type inference. First argument is string to split; second argument is separator to split on.
       Example:
       splitnv("a,b,c", ",") = {"1":"a","2":"b","3":"c"}

   splitnvx
        (class=conversion #args=2) Splits string by separator into integer-indexed map without type inference (values are strings). First argument is string to split; second argument is separator to split on.
       Example:
       splitnvx("3,4,5", ",") = {"1":"3","2":"4","3":"5"}

   sqrt
        (class=math #args=1) Square root.

   ssub
        (class=string #args=3) Like sub but does no regexing. No characters are special.
       Example:
       ssub("abc.def", ".", "X") gives "abcXdef"

   strftime
        (class=time #args=2) Formats seconds since the epoch as timestamp. Format strings are as at https://pkg.go.dev/github.com/lestrrat-go/strftime, with the Miller-specific addition of "%1S" through "%9S" which format the seconds with 1 through 9 decimal places, respectively. ("%S" uses no decimal places.) See also https://miller.readthedocs.io/en/latest/reference-dsl-time/ for more information on the differences from the C library ("man strftime" on your system). See also strftime_local.
       Examples:
       strftime(1440768801.7,"%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ")  = "2015-08-28T13:33:21Z"
       strftime(1440768801.7,"%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%3SZ") = "2015-08-28T13:33:21.700Z"

   strftime_local
        (class=time #args=2,3) Like strftime but consults the $TZ environment variable to get local time zone.
       Examples:
       strftime_local(1440768801.7, "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S %z")  = "2015-08-28 16:33:21 +0300" with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       strftime_local(1440768801.7, "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%3S %z") = "2015-08-28 16:33:21.700 +0300" with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       strftime_local(1440768801.7, "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%3S %z", "Asia/Istanbul") = "2015-08-28 16:33:21.700 +0300"

   string
        (class=conversion #args=1) Convert int/float/bool/string/array/map to string.

   strip
        (class=string #args=1) Strip leading and trailing whitespace from string.

   strlen
        (class=string #args=1) String length.

   strptime
        (class=time #args=2) strptime: Parses timestamp as floating-point seconds since the epoch. See also strptime_local.
       Examples:
       strptime("2015-08-28T13:33:21Z",      "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ")   = 1440768801.000000
       strptime("2015-08-28T13:33:21.345Z",  "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ")   = 1440768801.345000
       strptime("1970-01-01 00:00:00 -0400", "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S %z") = 14400
       strptime("1970-01-01 00:00:00 EET",   "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S %Z") = -7200

   strptime_local
        (class=time #args=2,3) Like strftime but consults the $TZ environment variable to get local time zone.
       Examples:
       strptime_local("2015-08-28T13:33:21Z",    "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ") = 1440758001     with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       strptime_local("2015-08-28T13:33:21.345Z","%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ") = 1440758001.345 with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       strptime_local("2015-08-28 13:33:21",     "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")  = 1440758001     with TZ="Asia/Istanbul"
       strptime_local("2015-08-28 13:33:21",     "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", "Asia/Istanbul") = 1440758001

   sub
        (class=string #args=3) '$name = sub($name, "old", "new")': replace once (first match, if there are multiple matches), with support for regular expressions. Capture groups \1 through \9 in the new part are matched from (...) in the old part, and must be used within the same call to sub -- they don't persist for subsequent DSL statements. See also =~ and regextract. See also "Regular expressions" at https://miller.readthedocs.io.
       Examples:
       sub("ababab", "ab", "XY") gives "XYabab"
       sub("abc.def", ".", "X") gives "Xbc.def"
       sub("abc.def", "\.", "X") gives "abcXdef"
       sub("abcdefg", "[ce]", "X") gives "abXdefg"
       sub("prefix4529:suffix8567", "suffix([0-9]+)", "name\1") gives "prefix4529:name8567"

   substr
        (class=string #args=3) substr is an alias for substr0. See also substr1. Miller is generally 1-up with all array and string indices, but, this is a backward-compatibility issue with Miller 5 and below. Arrays are new in Miller 6; the substr function is older.

   substr0
        (class=string #args=3) substr0(s,m,n) gives substring of s from 0-up position m to n inclusive. Negative indices -len .. -1 alias to 0 .. len-1. See also substr and substr1.

   substr1
        (class=string #args=3) substr1(s,m,n) gives substring of s from 1-up position m to n inclusive. Negative indices -len .. -1 alias to 1 .. len. See also substr and substr0.

   system
        (class=system #args=1) Run command string, yielding its stdout minus final carriage return.

   systime
        (class=time #args=0) Returns the system time in floating-point seconds since the epoch.

   systimeint
        (class=time #args=0) Returns the system time in integer seconds since the epoch.

   tan
        (class=math #args=1) Trigonometric tangent.

   tanh
        (class=math #args=1) Hyperbolic tangent.

   tolower
        (class=string #args=1) Convert string to lowercase.

   toupper
        (class=string #args=1) Convert string to uppercase.

   truncate
        (class=string #args=2) Truncates string first argument to max length of int second argument.

   typeof
        (class=typing #args=1) Convert argument to type of argument (e.g. "str"). For debug.

   unflatten
        (class=collections #args=2) Reverses flatten. Useful for nested JSON-like structures for non-JSON file formats like CSV. The first argument is a map, and the second argument is the flatten separator. See also arrayify. See "Flatten/unflatten: converting between JSON and tabular formats" at https://miller.readthedocs.io for more information.
       Example:
       unflatten({"a.b.c" : 4}, ".") is {"a": "b": { "c": 4 }}.

   unformat
        (class=string #args=2) Using first argument as format string, unpacks second argument into an array of matches, with type-inference. On non-match, returns error -- use is_error() to check.
       Examples:
       unformat("{}:{}:{}",  "1:2:3") gives [1, 2, 3].
       unformat("{}h{}m{}s", "3h47m22s") gives [3, 47, 22].
       is_error(unformat("{}h{}m{}s", "3:47:22")) gives true.

   unformatx
        (class=string #args=2) Same as unformat, but without type-inference.
       Examples:
       unformatx("{}:{}:{}",  "1:2:3") gives ["1", "2", "3"].
       unformatx("{}h{}m{}s", "3h47m22s") gives ["3", "47", "22"].
       is_error(unformatx("{}h{}m{}s", "3:47:22")) gives true.

   uptime
        (class=time #args=0) Returns the time in floating-point seconds since the current Miller program was started.

   urand
        (class=math #args=0) Floating-point numbers uniformly distributed on the unit interval.
       Example:
       Int-valued example: '$n=floor(20+urand()*11)'.

   urand32
        (class=math #args=0) Integer uniformly distributed 0 and 2**32-1 inclusive.

   urandelement
        (class=math #args=1) Random sample from the first argument, which must be an non-empty array.

   urandint
        (class=math #args=2) Integer uniformly distributed between inclusive integer endpoints.

   urandrange
        (class=math #args=2) Floating-point numbers uniformly distributed on the interval [a, b).

   utf8_to_latin1
        (class=string #args=1) Tries to convert UTF-8-encoded string to Latin-1-encoded string. If argument is array or map, recurses into it.
       Examples:
       $y = utf8_to_latin1($x)
       $* = utf8_to_latin1($*)

   version
        (class=system #args=0) Returns the Miller version as a string.

   !
        (class=boolean #args=1) Logical negation.

   !=
        (class=boolean #args=2) String/numeric inequality. Mixing number and string results in string compare.

   !=~
        (class=boolean #args=2) String (left-hand side) does not match regex (right-hand side), e.g. '$name !=~ "^a.*b$"'.

   %
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Remainder; never negative-valued (pythonic).

   &
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Bitwise AND.

   &&
        (class=boolean #args=2) Logical AND.

   *
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Multiplication, with integer*integer overflow to float.

   **
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Exponentiation. Same as pow, but as an infix operator.

   +
        (class=arithmetic #args=1,2) Addition as binary operator; unary plus operator.

   -
        (class=arithmetic #args=1,2) Subtraction as binary operator; unary negation operator.

   .
        (class=string #args=2) String concatenation. Non-strings are coerced, so you can do '"ax".98' etc.

   .*
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Multiplication, with integer-to-integer overflow.

   .+
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Addition, with integer-to-integer overflow.

   .-
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Subtraction, with integer-to-integer overflow.

   ./
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Integer division, rounding toward zero.

   /
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Division. Integer / integer is integer when exact, else floating-point: e.g. 6/3 is 2 but 6/4 is 1.5.

   //
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Pythonic integer division, rounding toward negative.

   <
        (class=boolean #args=2) String/numeric less-than. Mixing number and string results in string compare.

   <<
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Bitwise left-shift.

   <=
        (class=boolean #args=2) String/numeric less-than-or-equals. Mixing number and string results in string compare.

   <=>
        (class=boolean #args=2) Comparator, nominally for sorting. Given a <=> b, returns <0, 0, >0 as a < b, a == b, or a > b, respectively.

   ==
        (class=boolean #args=2) String/numeric equality. Mixing number and string results in string compare.

   =~
        (class=boolean #args=2) String (left-hand side) matches regex (right-hand side), e.g. '$name =~ "^a.*b$"'. Capture groups \1 through \9 are matched from (...) in the right-hand side, and can be used within subsequent DSL statements. See also "Regular expressions" at https://miller.readthedocs.io.
       Examples:
       With if-statement: if ($url =~ "http.*com") { ... }
       Without if-statement: given $line = "index ab09 file", and $line =~ "([a-z][a-z])([0-9][0-9])", then $label = "[\1:\2]", $label is "[ab:09]"

   >
        (class=boolean #args=2) String/numeric greater-than. Mixing number and string results in string compare.

   >=
        (class=boolean #args=2) String/numeric greater-than-or-equals. Mixing number and string results in string compare.

   >>
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Bitwise signed right-shift.

   >>>
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Bitwise unsigned right-shift.

   ?:
        (class=boolean #args=3) Standard ternary operator.

   ??
        (class=boolean #args=2) Absent-coalesce operator. $a ?? 1 evaluates to 1 if $a isn't defined in the current record.

   ???
        (class=boolean #args=2) Absent/empty-coalesce operator. $a ??? 1 evaluates to 1 if $a isn't defined in the current record, or has empty value.

   ^
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Bitwise XOR.

   ^^
        (class=boolean #args=2) Logical XOR.

   |
        (class=arithmetic #args=2) Bitwise OR.

   ||
        (class=boolean #args=2) Logical OR.

   ~
        (class=arithmetic #args=1) Bitwise NOT. Beware '$y=~$x' since =~ is the regex-match operator: try '$y = ~$x'.

KEYWORDS FOR PUT AND FILTER
   all
       all: used in "emit1", "emit", "emitp", and "unset" as a synonym for @*

   begin
       begin: defines a block of statements to be executed before input records
       are ingested. The body statements must be wrapped in curly braces.

         Example: 'begin { @count = 0 }'

   bool
       bool: declares a boolean local variable in the current curly-braced scope.
       Type-checking happens at assignment: 'bool b = 1' is an error.

   break
       break: causes execution to continue after the body of the current for/while/do-while loop.

   call
       call: used for invoking a user-defined subroutine.

         Example: 'subr s(k,v) { print k . " is " . v} call s("a", $a)'

   continue
       continue: causes execution to skip the remaining statements in the body of
       the current for/while/do-while loop. For-loop increments are still applied.

   do
       do: with "while", introduces a do-while loop. The body statements must be wrapped
       in curly braces.

   dump
       dump: prints all currently defined out-of-stream variables immediately
       to stdout as JSON.

       With >, >>, or |, the data do not go directly to stdout but are instead
       redirected.

       The > and >> are for write and append, as in the shell, but (as with awk) the
       file-overwrite for > is on first write, not per record. The | is for piping to
       a process which will process the data. There will be one open file for each
       distinct file name (for > and >>) or one subordinate process for each distinct
       value of the piped-to command (for |). Output-formatting flags are taken from
       the main command line.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q '@v[NR]=$*; end { dump }'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q '@v[NR]=$*; end { dump >  "mytap.dat"}'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q '@v[NR]=$*; end { dump >> "mytap.dat"}'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q '@v[NR]=$*; end { dump | "jq .[]"}'

   edump
       edump: prints all currently defined out-of-stream variables immediately
       to stderr as JSON.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q '@v[NR]=$*; end { edump }'

   elif
       elif: the way Miller spells "else if". The body statements must be wrapped
       in curly braces.

   else
       else: terminates an if/elif/elif chain. The body statements must be wrapped
       in curly braces.

   emit1
       emit1: inserts an out-of-stream variable into the output record stream. Unlike
       the other map variants, side-by-sides, indexing, and redirection are not supported,
       but you can emit any map-valued expression.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'emit1 $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'emit1 mapsum({"id": NR}, $*)'

       Please see https://miller.readthedocs.io://johnkerl.org/miller/doc for more information.

   emit
       emit: inserts an out-of-stream variable into the output record stream. Hashmap
       indices present in the data but not slotted by emit arguments are not output.

       With >, >>, or |, the data do not become part of the output record stream but
       are instead redirected.

       The > and >> are for write and append, as in the shell, but (as with awk) the
       file-overwrite for > is on first write, not per record. The | is for piping to
       a process which will process the data. There will be one open file for each
       distinct file name (for > and >>) or one subordinate process for each distinct
       value of the piped-to command (for |). Output-formatting flags are taken from
       the main command line.

       You can use any of the output-format command-line flags, e.g. --ocsv, --ofs,
       etc., to control the format of the output if the output is redirected. See also mlr -h.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'emit >  "/tmp/data-".$a, $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'emit >  "/tmp/data-".$a, mapexcept($*, "a")'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit @sums'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put --ojson '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit > "tap-".$a.$b.".dat", @sums'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit @sums, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit >  "mytap.dat", @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit >> "mytap.dat", @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit | "gzip > mytap.dat.gz", @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit > stderr, @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emit | "grep somepattern", @*, "index1", "index2"'

       Please see https://miller.readthedocs.io://johnkerl.org/miller/doc for more information.

   emitf
       emitf: inserts non-indexed out-of-stream variable(s) side-by-side into the
       output record stream.

       With >, >>, or |, the data do not become part of the output record stream but
       are instead redirected.

       The > and >> are for write and append, as in the shell, but (as with awk) the
       file-overwrite for > is on first write, not per record. The | is for piping to
       a process which will process the data. There will be one open file for each
       distinct file name (for > and >>) or one subordinate process for each distinct
       value of the piped-to command (for |). Output-formatting flags are taken from
       the main command line.

       You can use any of the output-format command-line flags, e.g. --ocsv, --ofs,
       etc., to control the format of the output if the output is redirected. See also mlr -h.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf @a'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put --oxtab '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf > "tap-".$i.".dat", @a'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf @a, @b, @c'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf > "mytap.dat", @a, @b, @c'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf >> "mytap.dat", @a, @b, @c'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf > stderr, @a, @b, @c'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf | "grep somepattern", @a, @b, @c'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@a=$i;@b+=$x;@c+=$y; emitf | "grep somepattern > mytap.dat", @a, @b, @c'

       Please see https://miller.readthedocs.io://johnkerl.org/miller/doc for more information.

   emitp
       emitp: inserts an out-of-stream variable into the output record stream.
       Hashmap indices present in the data but not slotted by emitp arguments are
       output concatenated with ":".

       With >, >>, or |, the data do not become part of the output record stream but
       are instead redirected.

       The > and >> are for write and append, as in the shell, but (as with awk) the
       file-overwrite for > is on first write, not per record. The | is for piping to
       a process which will process the data. There will be one open file for each
       distinct file name (for > and >>) or one subordinate process for each distinct
       value of the piped-to command (for |). Output-formatting flags are taken from
       the main command line.

       You can use any of the output-format command-line flags, e.g. --ocsv, --ofs,
       etc., to control the format of the output if the output is redirected. See also mlr -h.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp @sums'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put --opprint '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp > "tap-".$a.$b.".dat", @sums'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp @sums, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp >  "mytap.dat", @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp >> "mytap.dat", @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp | "gzip > mytap.dat.gz", @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp > stderr, @*, "index1", "index2"'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '@sums[$a][$b]+=$x; emitp | "grep somepattern", @*, "index1", "index2"'

       Please see https://miller.readthedocs.io://johnkerl.org/miller/doc for more information.

   end
       end: defines a block of statements to be executed after input records
       are ingested. The body statements must be wrapped in curly braces.

         Example: 'end { emit @count }'
         Example: 'end { eprint "Final count is " . @count }'

   eprint
       eprint: prints expression immediately to stderr.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'eprint "The sum of x and y is ".($x+$y)'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'for (k, v in $*) { eprint k . " => " . v }'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put  '(NR % 1000 == 0) { eprint "Checkpoint ".NR}'

   eprintn
       eprintn: prints expression immediately to stderr, without trailing newline.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'eprintn "The sum of x and y is ".($x+$y); eprint ""'

   false
       false: the boolean literal value.

   filter
       filter: includes/excludes the record in the output record stream.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'filter (NR == 2 || $x > 5.4)'

       Instead of put with 'filter false' you can simply use put -q.  The following
       uses the input record to accumulate data but only prints the running sum
       without printing the input record:

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q '@running_sum += $x * $y; emit @running_sum'

   float
       float: declares a floating-point local variable in the current curly-braced scope.
       Type-checking happens at assignment: 'float x = 0' is an error.

   for
       for: defines a for-loop using one of three styles. The body statements must
       be wrapped in curly braces.
       For-loop over stream record:

         Example:  'for (k, v in $*) { ... }'

       For-loop over out-of-stream variables:

         Example: 'for (k, v in @counts) { ... }'
         Example: 'for ((k1, k2), v in @counts) { ... }'
         Example: 'for ((k1, k2, k3), v in @*) { ... }'

       C-style for-loop:

         Example:  'for (var i = 0, var b = 1; i < 10; i += 1, b *= 2) { ... }'

   func
       func: used for defining a user-defined function.

         Example: 'func f(a,b) { return sqrt(a**2+b**2)} $d = f($x, $y)'

   funct
       funct: used for saying that a function argument is a user-defined function.

         Example: 'func g(num a, num b, funct f) :num { return f(a**2+b**2) }'

   if
       if: starts an if/elif/elif chain. The body statements must be wrapped
       in curly braces.

   in
       in: used in for-loops over stream records or out-of-stream variables.

   int
       int: declares an integer local variable in the current curly-braced scope.
       Type-checking happens at assignment: 'int x = 0.0' is an error.

   map
       map: declares an map-valued local variable in the current curly-braced scope.
       Type-checking happens at assignment: 'map b = 0' is an error. map b = {} is
       always OK. map b = a is OK or not depending on whether a is a map.

   num
       num: declares an int/float local variable in the current curly-braced scope.
       Type-checking happens at assignment: 'num b = true' is an error.

   print
       print: prints expression immediately to stdout.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'print "The sum of x and y is ".($x+$y)'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'for (k, v in $*) { print k . " => " . v }'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put  '(NR % 1000 == 0) { print > stderr, "Checkpoint ".NR}'

   printn
       printn: prints expression immediately to stdout, without trailing newline.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'printn "."; end { print "" }'

   return
       return: specifies the return value from a user-defined function.
       Omitted return statements (including via if-branches) result in an absent-null
       return value, which in turns results in a skipped assignment to an LHS.

   stderr
       stderr: Used for tee, emit, emitf, emitp, print, and dump in place of filename
       to print to standard error.

   stdout
       stdout: Used for tee, emit, emitf, emitp, print, and dump in place of filename
       to print to standard output.

   str
       str: declares a string local variable in the current curly-braced scope.
       Type-checking happens at assignment.

   subr
       subr: used for defining a subroutine.

         Example: 'subr s(k,v) { print k . " is " . v} call s("a", $a)'

   tee
       tee: prints the current record to specified file.
       This is an immediate print to the specified file (except for pprint format
       which of course waits until the end of the input stream to format all output).

       The > and >> are for write and append, as in the shell, but (as with awk) the
       file-overwrite for > is on first write, not per record. The | is for piping to
       a process which will process the data. There will be one open file for each
       distinct file name (for > and >>) or one subordinate process for each distinct
       value of the piped-to command (for |). Output-formatting flags are taken from
       the main command line.

       You can use any of the output-format command-line flags, e.g. --ocsv, --ofs,
       etc., to control the format of the output. See also mlr -h.

       emit with redirect and tee with redirect are identical, except tee can only
       output $*.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'tee >  "/tmp/data-".$a, $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'tee >> "/tmp/data-".$a.$b, $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'tee >  stderr, $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'tee | "tr \[a-z\\] \[A-Z\\]", $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'tee | "tr \[a-z\\] \[A-Z\\] > /tmp/data-".$a, $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q 'tee | "gzip > /tmp/data-".$a.".gz", $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put -q --ojson 'tee | "gzip > /tmp/data-".$a.".gz", $*'

   true
       true: the boolean literal value.

   unset
       unset: clears field(s) from the current record, or an out-of-stream or local variable.

         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'unset $x'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'unset $*'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put 'for (k, v in $*) { if (k =~ "a.*") { unset $[k] } }'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '...; unset @sums'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '...; unset @sums["green"]'
         Example: mlr --from f.dat put '...; unset @*'

   var
       var: declares an untyped local variable in the current curly-braced scope.

         Examples: 'var a=1', 'var xyz=""'

   while
       while: introduces a while loop, or with "do", introduces a do-while loop.
       The body statements must be wrapped in curly braces.

   ENV
       ENV: access to environment variables by name, e.g. '$home = ENV["HOME"]'

   FILENAME
       FILENAME: evaluates to the name of the current file being processed.

   FILENUM
       FILENUM: evaluates to the number of the current file being processed,
       starting with 1.

   FNR
       FNR: evaluates to the number of the current record within the current file
       being processed, starting with 1. Resets at the start of each file.

   IFS
       IFS: evaluates to the input field separator from the command line.

   IPS
       IPS: evaluates to the input pair separator from the command line.

   IRS
       IRS: evaluates to the input record separator from the command line,
       or to LF or CRLF from the input data if in autodetect mode (which is
       the default).

   M_E
       M_E: the mathematical constant e.

   M_PI
       M_PI: the mathematical constant pi.

   NF
       NF: evaluates to the number of fields in the current record.

   NR
       NR: evaluates to the number of the current record over all files
       being processed, starting with 1. Does not reset at the start of each file.

   OFS
       OFS: evaluates to the output field separator from the command line.

   OPS
       OPS: evaluates to the output pair separator from the command line.

   ORS
       ORS: evaluates to the output record separator from the command line,
       or to LF or CRLF from the input data if in autodetect mode (which is
       the default).

AUTHOR
       Miller is written by John Kerl <kerl.john.r@gmail.com>.

       This manual page has been composed from Miller's help output by Eric
       MSP Veith <eveith@veith-m.de>.

SEE ALSO
       awk(1), sed(1), cut(1), join(1), sort(1), RFC 4180: Common Format and
       MIME Type for Comma-Separated Values (CSV) Files, the Miller docsite
       https://miller.readthedocs.io



                                  2022-03-20                         MILLER(1)
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